Posts Tagged ‘William Moulton Marston’

Review – IDW’s Wonder Woman: The Complete Newspaper Strip, 1944-1945 by William Moulton Marston and H.G. Peter

December 16, 2014

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I recently read and absolutely loved IDW’s collection of the short running Wonder Woman comic strip from the 1940s, and I was fascinated with the way the strips compared to the regular Wonder Woman comic books. Both were done by Wonder Woman’s original creative team of William Moulton Marston and H.G. Peter, but the strip debuted more than two years after Wonder Woman first appeared. With a couple years under their belts, they duo got a second chance to introduce Wonder Woman’s feminist message to a new audience, and the differences in the strips are just as interesting as what stayed the same. I examined IDW’s collection as compared to the original comics in a review that’s up now at The Comics Journal.

Marston doubled down on his matriarchal message, making it explicitly clear that Wonder Woman was coming to America to conquer the patriarchy. Look at this comparison of Wonder Woman leaving Paradise Island for the first time, and see what Marston added to the strip:

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He also kept his bondage fetishism front and center as always. In fact, the Cheetah story in the strips is completely different from the Cheetah’s first appearance in Wonder Woman except for an elaborate bondage sequence that was redrawn by Peter almost exactly as it first appeared:

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Head on over to The Comics Journal for more pictures and my full review.

Wonder Woman’s 1943-1944 Newspaper Strips Collected By IDW

June 25, 2014

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IDW’s done a great job collecting DC Comics’ classic comic book strips, and now they’re collecting Wonder Woman’s strips from the early 1940s in a book due out in August in comic shops and September in bookstores. The strips were written and drawn by Wonder Woman’s original creative team, William Moulton Marston and H.G. Peter, and have been largely forgotten; while the Superman and Batman strips ran for several years, Wonder Woman’s strip only ran for a year and a half. This volume collects the entire run.

I think this book is going to be a treasure trove of Golden Age fun. The original Sensation Comics and Wonder Woman were absolutely bonkers books that combined World War II, Greek deities, space invaders, feminism, bondage, and so much more. I’m excited to see some new adventures from the original creative team, though I suspect that a lot of the book will be retellings of stories from the comic books, or vice versa. The Superman strips did that a lot, and this group of strips is very similar to the beginning of Wonder Woman #6:

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But that’s in no way a bad thing. It will be fascinating to see classic Wonder Woman tales reinterpreted in comic strip form.

This book is obviously right up my alley as a historian who wrote a book about Wonder Woman, but I think it will be a lot of fun for all Wonder Woman fans. It should be a good introduction to the original character, with the added benefit of having Marston and Peter at their peak and with a solid handle on the character after a couple of years of comics under their belt. The book will be a fascinating distillation of the Golden Age Wonder Woman, and I can’t wait to read it.

Wonder Woman: The Complete Newspaper Comics is available for pre-order now, online or at your local comic shop. It’s $50, but this is such a cool piece of Wonder Woman history that I strongly urge everyone to check it out.

“America’s Silver Age,” My Piece On Gender And Race In Silver Age Wonder Woman Comics For The Los Angeles Review Of Books

April 14, 2014

This weekend, a piece I wrote about Wonder Woman’s Silver Age comics went up at the Los Angeles Review of Books. We really could have called it “Ugh, White Men, Am I Right?” but “America’s Silver Age” is a classier title choice. Ostensibly a review of Wonder Woman: The Amazon Princess Archives, Volume 1, which came out a while ago, the piece looks at the depiction of women and people of colour (or rather, the lack thereof) in Robert Kanigher, Ross Andru, and Mike Esposito’s revision of Wonder Woman that began in 1958.

In the Golden Age, William Moulton Marston and H.G. Peter’s Wonder Woman was all about female strength and superiority. It was also a fairly racially diverse comic for the time, though these depictions of people of colour ran the gamut from moderately positive to offensive stereotypes. Marston himself wasn’t nearly as forward thinking about race as he was about gender; in his psychological writing he frowned on interracial relationships, and he had a number of connections with known eugenics supporters and sympathizers, including his de facto aunt, Margaret Sanger. Nonetheless, the early years of Wonder Woman actually portrayed people of colour at least, however problematically.

When Kanigher, Andru, and Esposito began their new take on Wonder Woman in 1958, Marston’s feminist messages went out the window, as did people of colour. In the thirteen issues collected in this first Silver Age Wonder Woman Archive volume, there are only three very brief instances that feature people of colour. This panel from Wonder Woman #103, featuring Inuits fleeing a glacier, was the most any non-white characters spoke in the book:

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It was a whitewashed book, removing race all together at a time when race was a daily issue in American society as the Civil Rights Movement continually gained momentum.

You can read the full piece over at the Los Angeles Review of Books, and of course learn more about Wonder Woman’s history generally in my book, Wonder Woman Unbound: The Curious History of the World’s Most Famous Heroine.

Wonder Woman Unbound Preview #8: Suffering Sappho!

March 3, 2014

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Every Monday until Wonder Woman Unbound: The Curious History of the World’s Most Famous Heroine comes out this April, we’re taking a look at a comic panel that captures a key moment in Wonder Woman’s history and highlights an important point from each chapter.

Wonder Woman had a colourful array of divinely inspired expressions she’d exclaim to punctuate her dialogue in the Silver Age.  “Merciful Minerva!”, “Great Hera!”, and “Thunderbolts of Jove!” were but a few of her Rob Burgundy-esque catchphrases.  But she had another common expression that didn’t reference a deity at all: “Suffering Sappho!”

Today we’re going to look at four panels, all from the same issue, that illustrate how widespread this expression was.  The panels are from Wonder Woman #115 in July 1960:

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That’s a lot of “Suffering Sappho!”  Sappho was an ancient Greek poet who is best known for poems where women professed their affection for other women; the name of her home, the island of Lesbos, is the basis for the term lesbian.  To mention Sappho is to make a very specific reference, and Kanigher did so often in the Silver Age.  Wonder Woman #115’s four times in one issue wasn’t even a record.

With all of the marriage-centric, romantic shenanigans in the Silver Age, it’s possible to read “Suffering Sappho!” as a subversion of this marital focus that hinted at Wonder Woman’s true lesbian leanings.  Lesbian inclinations were a part of Wonder Woman from the very beginning of the series, and William Moulton Marston’s psychological work broke with the trends of the time and was firmly in favour of sexual relations between women.  There was a lot going on between the lines in the first few decades of Wonder Woman.

To read more, you’ll have to wait until Wonder Woman Unbound comes out this April!  Be sure to come back next Monday, when we’ll look at Wonder Woman’s mod era, and also check out the seventh installment of my Wonder Woman interview series this Wednesday; we’ll be talking with some great Wonder Woman artists!

Wonder Unbound Unbound is available for pre-order now, online or at your local comic shop.

Wonder Woman Unbound Preview #4: Bound And Determined

February 3, 2014

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Every Monday until Wonder Woman Unbound: The Curious History of the World’s Most Famous Heroine comes out this April, we’re taking a look at a comic panel that captures a key moment in Wonder Woman’s history and highlights an important point from each chapter.

Wonder Woman was a hero far ahead of her time, advocating for the strength and superiority of women.  The utopian Paradise Island showcased the benefits of matriarchal rule, but William Moulton Marston chose an unusual metaphor; the most common activity on Paradise Island was bondage games, like in this panel from Wonder Woman #13:

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Bondage imagery made up a significant portion of Wonder Woman’s Golden Age comic books, and it had a specific purpose.  On Paradise Island, being controlled by women was a fun, pleasant activity.  Everyone in the panel above is clearly having a good time.  But out in the world of men, bondage became a harsh critique of patriarchy.  Being controlled by a man was always unpleasant and oppressive for Wonder Woman and her friends.

This bondage metaphor, while odd for a children’s comic, holds up in theory.  In practice, however, there were certain fixations in Marston’s employment of the metaphor that complicated the message.  The feminism was wrapped up in a fetishism that occasionally took a dark turn and clouded Wonder Woman’s progressive aims.

To read more, you’ll have to wait until Wonder Woman Unbound comes out this April!  Be sure to come back next Monday, when we’ll look at some Wonder Women, plural, and also check out the third installment of my interview series this Wednesday; we’ll be talking with Janelle Asselin!

Wonder Unbound Unbound is available for pre-order now, online or at your local comic shop.

Wonder Woman Unbound Preview #2: Utopian Origins

January 20, 2014

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Every Monday until Wonder Woman Unbound: The Curious History of the World’s Most Famous Heroine comes out this April, we’re taking a look at a comic panel that captures a key moment in Wonder Woman’s history and highlights an important point from each chapter.

Last week we saw a brutal Superman threatening to kill a bad guy.  This week, we see an alternative approach to superheroics with this panel from the very first appearance of Wonder Woman in All-Star Comics #8 in December 1941:

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While the origins of male superheroes featured destroyed planets, dead parents, and a whole host of anger and abandonment issues, Wonder Woman came from a feminist utopia.  The Amazons were an advanced race who lived on a peaceful island that provided them with everything they could possibly need, and their utopian existence made them all as strong and as capable as superheroes.  Paradise Island illustrated William Moulton Marston’s belief that a matriarchal society would be far superior to patriarchy.

Wonder Woman was the product of this feminist paradise, and its values led her to a new approach to crimefighting that made her markedly different from her superhero peers.  She traded anger and aggression for love and compassion, modeling the feminist ideals of her home to improve the outside world.

To read more, you’ll have to wait until Wonder Woman Unbound comes out this April!  But there are still lots of sneak peeks to come, and next week we’ll look at a couple of damsels in distress.

Wonder Woman Unbound Preview #1: The Status Quo

January 13, 2014

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Wonder Woman Unbound: The Curious History of the World’s Most Famous Heroine is set to hit bookstores this April, so I thought it would be fun to take a peek at what’s in the book.  Every Monday until the book comes out, I’ll put up a comic panel that captures a key moment in Wonder Woman’s history and highlights an important point from each chapter.

When the book was announced in December we saw a panel that is discussed in the very first sentence of the introduction, Diana trying on dresses in Wonder Woman #182, but for Chapter One we go back to a time before Wonder Woman was created with this panel from Action Comics #2 in July 1938:

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This is not the Superman we all know and love.  Threatening to kill a bad guy and circumventing the law by meting out his own punishment is not what we’re used to seeing from the Big Blue Boy Scout, but Superman had a darker edge in his early years.  And he wasn’t the only one; Batman carried a gun and “accidentally” killed several villains, Captain America had a high body count as well, and threats, violence, and death were the norm for most superhero comics at the dawn of the Golden Age.  All of these heroes would soon develop a kinder code of conduct, but it took a few years.

It was in this environment of violence and aggression that Wonder Woman first appeared.  William Moulton Marston wanted to counter the “blood-curdling masculinity” of the superhero genre and so he created a female hero who was motivated by love and a belief that everyone could be a better person, not by anger and violence.

To read more, you’ll have to wait until Wonder Woman Unbound comes out in April!  Next Monday, we’ll take a look at a panel from Wonder Woman’s very first appearance in All-Star Comics #8.


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