Top Five Wonder Woman Covers: Pre-Crisis Faceoff

UPDATE: The poll is now closed.  The two semi-final votes begin in new threads on January 25th and February 1st, and then the final vote starts February 8th.

We have already looked at H.G. Peter. Irv Novick, and Ross Andru, who drew pretty much every Wonder Woman cover between 1942 and 1968, so this list isn’t “pre-Crisis” so much as just the twenty years before Crisis on Infinite Earths.  But oh well… there are also six covers, as there were last week, but I still named the post “Top Five” to avoid confusion.  This is not a brilliant exercise in titling.  But there are some lovely covers, and this week we have Mike Sekowsky vs. Ross Andru AND Dick Giordano vs. José Luis Garcia-López!!

Mike Sekowsky is probably best known for his lengthy run on Justice League of America in the 1960s, but in 1968 he became the artist for Wonder Woman with her mod re-launch, including the covers from Wonder Woman #178-196.  He later worked at Marvel, and then in animation for Hanna-Barbera.  We have looked at Ross Andru covers before, but after his original tenure on the book he did a sizable number of covers with famed inker Dick Giordano in the 1970s and 1980s.  Giordano is one of the best inkers of all time, and also served as Executive Editor of DC Comics.  Their covers appeared semi-regularly between Wonder Woman #251-311.  José Luis Garcia-López is a Spanish artist who has drawn pretty much every major character at DC Comics.  His Wonder Woman covers were sporadic at best, but fantastic.

Here are my choices for the best two covers from each artist, with the poll at the very bottom:

Mike Sekowsky

Wonder Woman #178:  This cover marked a new era for Wonder Woman and introduced the hip and fashionable (though now hilariously dated) Diana Prince.  Looking back on it now, the cover is an amusing attempt to be all groovy and such, but at the time it must have come as a huge shock to young readers to see Wonder Woman take on such a bold new direction.

Wonder Woman #179:  Now it’s official… the previous issue set up a new look for Diana Prince, but this issue established the end of her Wonder Woman persona as well.  This cover shows Diana tearfully leaving her Amazon family behind, but lucky for her she had a closetful of new fashions to return to.

Ross Andru and Dick Giordano

Wonder Woman #269:  Wonder Woman quitting seems to be a theme today!  Here, Wonder Woman storms off, sick of man’s world, tossing aside her lasso and tiara.  It’s totally a “Screw you guys, I’m going home” situation, but decades before Cartman.

Wonder Woman #292:  The faux-book layout of this cover is a little odd, but the art is so cool.  The picture of Wonder Woman in the foreground is great and totally captures the character well, and then there are tons of guest stars in the background, including Supergirl, Black Canary, Huntress, Power Girl, and more.  I dig it even with the weird framing.

José Luis Garcia-López

Wonder Woman #306:  Do I even need to tell you why this cover is fantastic?  You’ve got that awesome picture of Wonder Woman in the background, and THEN Wonder Woman with the lasso going atop an in-flight invisible plane.  This cover is crazy great!!

Wonder Woman #329:  Again with the ending of eras!!  This was the last issue of Wonder Woman before the Peréz re-launch in 1987, and they decided to go out on a high note, coverwise.  Wonder Woman looks defiant, and ready to kick some ass, while the hordes behind her seem prepared to lend a hand as well. 

So there are my top six covers… keep track of any omissions you think I’ve made for the upcoming “Egregious Snubs” list, and vote for your favourite of the six below:

Tags: , , , , ,

One Response to “Top Five Wonder Woman Covers: Pre-Crisis Faceoff”

  1. In My Not So Humble Opinion: the Writings and Ramblings of Ben Herman Says:

    I am coming to the party late, but I have to agree with you that José Luis Garcia-López is one of my all time favorite Wonder Woman artists. His cover for #329 is stunning. I also enjoyed the year-or-so worth of covers he did on Wonder Woman post-Crisis during John Byrne’s run on the series.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: