Women At Marvel Comics Watch – December 2014 Solicits


After a decent (by Marvel standards) November, the solicits for December aren’t looking great for female creators at Marvel, though it should be a decent month for female characters at least. Yet another female character is launching her own series, and with female creators, but even with these additions the numbers across the board remain very low. Let’s see what’s coming from Marvel this December:

  • For female writers, Kelly Sue DeConnick is on Captain Marvel #10, Robin Furth is co-writing The Dark Tower: The Drawing of the Three – The Prisoner #5, and Marguerite Bennett is co-writing Angela: Asgard’s Assassin #1.
  • Don’t worry, Ms. Marvel fans! The book, and G. Willow Wilson, is just taking a month off and will be back in January.
  • For artists, Stephanie Hans is doing the cover and some interior art for Angela: Asgard’s Assassin #1 as well as the cover for Storm #6, Afua Richardson is doing a variant cover for Captain America and the Mighty Avengers #3, Sara Pichelli is doing a variant cover for S.H.I.E.L.D. #1, and Jordie Bellaire is colouring the cover of Moon Knight #10.
  • And that is all.
  • For female characters, Angela: Asgard’s Assassin is launching with a female lead, the new S.H.I.E.L.D. book features several female characters, and Spider-Man and the X-Men #1 appears to feature some of the female students at the Jean Grey School for Higher Learning.

All together, there are 7 different women scheduled to work on 7 different books in December, a big drop from November’s 12 and 15, respectively. And by “big”, I mean there will be half as many comics with at least one female creator as there were last month. That’s pretty bad.

Angela: Asgard’s Assassin is obviously one of the few good bits of news out of these solicits. Not only does it star a female character, it also has two female creators working on the comic in regular gigs. It’s especially nice to see a woman do some interior art, because Marvel has had a poor track record in that area lately.

However, as exciting as Angela: Asgard’s Assassin is, it’s absolutely ridiculous that Marvel launched a new series with two female creators and their overall total of women making comics still dropped by FIVE from the month previous. And while G. Willow Wilson will be back next month, Robin Furth will likely be gone seeing as this was the last issue of this Dark Tower mini-series. I’m hoping that Marvel will announce a bevy of new books starring and created by women at NYCC this weekend (and we’ve already got one of each out of the same book with Erica Henderson drawing Squirrel Girl) because they absolutely need a lot more of both.

So, December’s not looking great. Sorry that your future festive fun will be marred by gender inequality. Thanks for ruining Christmas, Marvel! And Hanukkah too! With such a rough looking December ahead of us, all that’s left to do is hope for a better January. And our hope might pay off, because really the numbers for female creators can’t get much worse. There’s nowhere to go but up! Hopefully I won’t have to eat those words next month.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

3 Responses to “Women At Marvel Comics Watch – December 2014 Solicits”

  1. Culture Decanted Says:

    Is it really gender inequality if titles don’t sell? Comics have always been a meritocracy based on talent. There are many brilliant comics of both genders and awful ones as well. The issue is not how many titles are out – if they Selling they will stay on shelf – but that both genders have the opportunity to work on any title. When you collate the titles like this, it reflects on who is reading comics as much as editorial decisions. Which suggests a broader social conversation.

    • Tim Hanley Says:

      Both genders don’t have the opportunity to work on any title. Both Marvel and DC are invitation only. Creators are asked to work there; there’s no submission process. So whoever’s making the books are people chosen by the various editorial teams. And they choose far more men than women, at a massively unequal ratio. Some titles don’t sell, sure, but titles written by/starring women don’t fail at any more than those written by/starring men. And working on a failed title rarely means you won’t get work at DC or Marvel again.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: