The Legend of Wonder Woman #18 Review OR The Costume Comes Together!


Etta Candy has had Diana’s back from the second she arrived in America, helping out the confused Diana just because she’s friendly, aiding her in tracking down news on the Duke of Deception, and following her to the front lines of the war in Europe.  Etta’s done this all without knowing very much about Diana; despite Etta’s many kindnesses, Diana’s remained tight-lipped about her true origins.  But Etta has a line, and apparently it’s watching her pal fly out of a window.  So in today’s digital issue of The Legend of Wonder Woman, Diana finally lays her cards on the table with Etta.  And, of course, Etta is super on board.

But first,  the book picked up where it left off last week, with Diana on the battlefield fighting the Duke of Deception’s twisted army.  Diana won, of course.  That’s what she does.  But the method in which she won was noteworthy for the way that it captured the essence of Wonder Woman.  Rather than punching her way through the undead soldiers, Diana took out her magic lasso and used its truth powers to disperse the hordes.  The Duke of Deception harnessed the souls of the dead to animate the corpses of the battlefield, but the lasso’s truth reminded the souls that they belonged to the land of the dead, not the living, and so they returned to where they belonged.  The fight was won, with no punching, just the power of truth!

Diana returned home to find Etta waiting for her, and Etta made Diana spill all of the beans about who she really was.  And Etta believed “every cock-a-mamie, deranged word of it,” in part because she’s a good friend and in part because she’s always up for an adventure and Diana’s kookiness certainly promised a lot of that.  I’m glad that everything is out in the open now, save for Diana’s encounter with Steve, which she kept to herself.  The women’s friendship, while fun and endearing, has been a little one-sided, with a lot of give from Etta and a lot of take from Diana.  But now they’re on the level, and can be partners in what comes next.  In fact, it was Etta who came up for the idea of the dowdy Diana Price taking on the new, flamboyant identity of Wonder Woman.

A makeover ensued, with hilarious results in perfect montage form.  Etta’s first idea for a costume involved shoulder pads and a lot of pouches, a clear shout out to superhero outfits of the 90s, but Etta discarded it for being “maybe a bit before its time.”  Diana rejected Etta’s suggestion of high heels in a fun nod to the never-ending debate over whether its practical for female superheroes to fight in heels.  They both agree that Diana should start to wear glasses to further conceal her identity, though.

After hours of work, the costume was finally finished.  And it was a mess!  Eagle wings under the arm, Diana’s hair in a bun, a weird red vest.  Etta was distraught at her failure.  Luckily, she spied the American flag that Diana was given when she first landed in America and stayed with the older couple who found her and nursed her back to health.  Inspired anew, Etta designed yet another costume, and the issue ended with hints of Wonder Woman’s iconic look but not a full reveal just yet.

The whole design scene was a blast.  I love a good makeover montage, and all of the in-jokes and references were funny and on point.  Wonder Woman rarely gets this kind of fun in her origins; she typically just shows up in costume and starts superheroing, so it was an enjoyable change to have her and Etta work to design her look from scratch.  Plus it’s so cool that it’s the two of them who come up with the idea and look for Wonder Woman, a melding of the perspectives of an Amazon woman and an American woman to create an icon of female power.

Also, we get confirmation that there’s a Justice Society, which is rad!  I’m all about the World War Two era Justice Society, fighting Nazis and saving the world.  I don’t know if we’ll see much of them in this book, but hopefully we’ll get a sequel that will expand Wonder Woman’s world to include some superhero pals.

So yeah, Renae De Liz and Ray Dillon have done it yet again.  From the battlefields of France to a fun makeover, this issue really does have everything.  Etta also says the line, “I’d be angrier than a barn cat on a corn griddle,” which is delightful.  It’s just the best book!  Go check out this issue now, and be sure to pick up the third print issue of The Legend of Wonder Woman, which hit stores yesterday!

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2 Responses to “The Legend of Wonder Woman #18 Review OR The Costume Comes Together!”

  1. Vorpal Says:

    This is the storyline that should be turned into the Wonder Woman movie, to be frank.

    This book has been nothing but a delight- which is a rare treat from DC nowadays.

  2. Jeppe Dittmer Says:

    I loved this issue. I had been a little puzzled by the one sided nature of Diana and Etta’s friendship so it was nice to finally have Diana open up.

    I this issue you can really see that Renae De Liz knows what she is doing as a storyteller (not that you couldn’t earlier), a lot of things got paid off nicely in this issue. Diana using the lasso, Diana finally opening up to Etta, Etta finally getting to dress Diana (I hadn’t even realized that all those fish out of water jokes about Diana’s clothes was of course a setup for the WW costumes’ creation), and of course the American flag being used in her costume. I knew that was gonna happen when the old lady gave it to her, but that happened so long ago that I had forgotten about, so that when we got to the costume montage, I wasn’t just waiting for them to get to the flag. Really nice storytelling on display in this issue.

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