Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Women in Comics Statistics: DC and Marvel, December 2016 in Review PLUS Year End Totals

February 27, 2017

genderxlogo

My latest “Gendercrunching” column went up at Bleeding Cool last week, and the year closed with decent numbers for female creators at both major superhero publishers, as well as several positive signs for increased representation in 2017.

DC’s overall percentage of female creators ticked down slightly to 18.6%, but it was their third highest total of the year and the past three months at DC have been among their best ever. After a bit of a slump, Marvel jumped a couple of percentage points to land at 17.6% female creators overall, below their recent highs but one of their better showings in some time.

We also take a look back at the year as a whole and both publishers’ numbers for female creators, overall and by category, are noticeably higher than they were a year ago. Also, at DC the monthly numbers are trending in a positive direction in several categories, which bodes well for 2017. Marvel’s trend lines are a little more mixed, but all of the interior art categories saw strong gains and few of the declines were steep.

Head on over to Bleeding Cool for all of the stats fun!

Wonder Woman’s April 2017 Covers and Solicits

January 24, 2017

DC’s solicits were a little bit late this month, but when they finally arrived yesterday they brought a bevy of new Wonder Woman comic books for us to look forward to this April. So let’s take a look at what Wonder Woman will be up to in a few months’ time, starting with her own series:

aprilww.jpg

WONDER WOMAN #20
Written by GREG RUCKA • Art and cover by BILQUIS EVELY • Variant cover by JENNY FRISON
“Godwatch” part three! Cale launches a desperate gambit to take control of Godwatch, but her plan hinges on two factors she cannot control: the witch Circe, and Wonder Woman!
On sale APRIL 12 • 32 pg, FC, $2.99 US • RATED T

WONDER WOMAN #21
Written by GREG RUCKA • Art and cover by LIAM SHARP • Variant cover by JENNY FRISON
“The Truth” part four! As the reality of Themyscira is revealed, Wonder Woman is forced to make a decision: defy the will of the gods or betray her Amazon sisters to Godwatch!
On sale APRIL 26 • 32 pg, FC, $2.99 US • RATED T

The dual narrative continues this April, with Wonder Woman facing off against Godwatch in the even numbered issues and learning the truth about Themyscira in the odd books. Circe’s going to be in Wonder Woman #20, which should be a lot of fun. After her poor portrayal in Superman/Wonder Woman a couple of years back, I’m looking forward to what can only be a better spin on her from Rucka and Evely.

Now onto Trinity:

apriltrin

TRINITY #8
Written by CULLEN BUNN • Art by EMANUELA LUPACCHINO and RAY McCARTHY • Cover by CLAY MANN • Variant cover by BILL SIENKIEWICZ
A “Superman: Reborn Aftermath” tie-in! In this essential chapter of the “Superman Reborn Aftermath” epic, Kal-El reveals to Batman and Wonder Woman what had happened to him—and how they all may be in danger!
On sale APRIL 19 • 32 pg, FC, $3.99 US • RATED T

I’ve been enjoying Trinity, but honestly I’m picking it up for the amazing Francis Manapul art and there just hasn’t been much of it. Now eight issues in, it looks like he’ll have drawn half of them at most, and we’re getting a tie-in issue with a Superman event? Not what I’m looking for. Hopefully Manapul is back in full force in May, because otherwise I might be ready to move on, especially with the $1 price hike.

Next up, some Amazon fun:

aprilodyssey

THE ODYSSEY OF THE AMAZONS #4
Written by KEVIN GREVIOUX
Art by RYAN BENJAMIN and RICHARD FRIEND
Cover by RYAN BENJAMIN
The Amazons are taken to Valhalla, heavenly home of warriors who have fallen in combat. Hessia learns where the Amazons originated and why their numbers have come to be spread throughout the world. But she’s also determined to find a way back to Earth, to rescue her comrades who have been taken by the Storm Giants. As for the Giants, they are getting ready to go to war.
On sale APRIL 19 • 32 pg, FC, 4 of 6, $3.99 US • RATED T+

This series starts TOMORROW, so we’ll know pretty soon if this is going to be worth picking up in April. While the buzz for it seems to be minimal/non-existent, a lot of great titles fly under the radar so we’ll see what happens. It still just sounds like a Thor book to me, but I’m curious to see what Grievoux, Benjamin, and Friend do. I’ll be checking out the first issue tomorrow and will report back if I have anything interesting to say about it.

Now some classic TV fun:

aprilb66w77

BATMAN ’66 MEETS WONDER WOMAN ’77 #4
Written by MARC ANDREYKO and JEFF PARKER • Art by DAVID HAHN and KARL KESEL • Cover by MICHAEL ALLRED
Ra’s al Ghul has discovered the Amazons’ Elysian Well…better known to Man’s World as a Lazarus Pit! Wonder Woman takes Batman and Robin (and Catwoman!) to confront him, but strange creatures live in the same maze, which the Amazons have used for centuries as a prison!
On sale APRIL 26 • 32 pg, FC, 4 of 6, $3.99 US • RATED E • DIGITAL FIRST

I’m so down for Catwoman on Paradise Island. You had me there, and you don’t have to sell me on anything else, DC. I’m super on board.

We’ve also got a few Wonder Woman collections announced. They include:

  • WONDER WOMAN VOL. 2: YEAR ONE TP: Collects WONDER WOMAN #2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 and 14. On sale MAY 3 • 168 pg, FC, $16.99 US. If you didn’t read this in single issues, BUY THIS. It’s phenomenal. Greg Rucka and Nicola Scott hit this one out of the park.
  • WONDER WOMAN BY JOHN BYRNE BOOK ONE HC: Collects WONDER WOMAN #101-114. On sale MAY 24 • 328 pg, FC, $39.99 US. A nice big collection of Byrne’s work on Wonder Woman, which I found moderately enjoyable when I read it. It’s Byrne before he went full on Internet wacko, which is usually worth checking out.
  • WONDER WOMAN: THE GOLDEN AGE OMNIBUS VOL. 2 HC: Collects COMIC CAVALCADE #6-13, SENSATION COMICS #25-48 and WONDER WOMAN #8-15. On sale JULY 5 • 768 pg, FC, $75.00 US. Early Marston/Peter Wonder Woman comics are always a good choice, and this HUGE new collection comes with a gorgeous Darwyn Cooke cover.

So we’ve got a nice selection of books to choose from this April, and some fine collections on the way as well. Should be fun!

Wonder Woman #14 Review: The Grand Finale of “Year One”

January 11, 2017

ww14.jpg

It’s been so long since we’ve had an in-continuity Wonder Woman story that was this good. Outside of continuity, there have been some great Wonder Woman tales over the past few years; The Legend of Wonder Woman was amazing, while there were some absolutely stellar issues of Sensation Comics over the course of its run. But in terms of the proper mainline Wonder Woman title itself, things haven’t been great for a while now. There were cool moments here and there, but the book has lacked a sustained start to finish arc that tells a good story and captures the essence of who Wonder Woman is, what she means, and why she’s important. Greg Rucka and Nicola Scott have given us such a tale, and it’s been a joy to read each issue. Today’s finale was a fitting close to the arc, one that stands on its own as a distillation of the heart of the character while also tying into everything else going on in “The Lies,” “The Truth,” and “Godwatch.” Let’s dig into it all, but first:

SPOILER ALERT!!

I am about to reveal all of the details in this exciting conclusion!

Look away if you haven’t read it yet!

Also, go read it! It’s really good!

When we last left our intrepid heroine, the god of war had appeared at the military installation where Wonder Woman was staying, and he seemed to be in a bad mood. His poor attitude wasn’t terribly surprising; Ares is known to have a rather foul disposition. But now we know what he was after: He wanted the location of the home of the Amazons, and he was going to take it by force if he had to.

Wonder Woman wasn’t interested in force, however. She battered Ares around a bit initially, but then took a different tack, and the scene that ensued captured everything I love about Rucka and Scott’s approach to Wonder Woman. First, she realized that fighting the god of war WITH war, i.e. confronting him directly and violently, wasn’t going to end well for anyone. He’s war incarnate, after all. He’s very good at it. So instead, she decided to talk to him, and supplicated herself before him.

Second, she then appealed to what is best in Ares. She didn’t insult him or try some kind of trickery. Instead, she gave him an honourable out when she told him, “Show us thine courage in mercy.” Wonder Woman recognized his power and offered him a way to use it that would make him look good while avoiding any bloodshed. It was a tactical move on her part, to be sure, but it also showed how Wonder Woman sees the best in everyone, understands their potential for good, and tries to help them achieve that. She met Ares on his own terms, and tried to turn him onto a path that would be for the good of all, himself included. And she was willing to humble herself to do so.

Third, Wonder Woman gave herself up for her friends. Kneeling before Ares is kind of a terrible idea. Exposing herself to the god of war, defenseless, could easily have taken a grisly turn. But she was willing to take that risk, put herself on the line, and trade whatever she could in order to find a peaceful solution to what could have been a violent conflict that endangered her friends. Her new friends, at that, and beyond. She barely knew Steve, Etta, and Barbara, and she’d been exposed to the evils of this outside world, and still she was willing to give herself up to keep them, and the wider world, safe.

Fourth, when all else failed and Ares didn’t get what he wanted, Wonder Woman knew how and where to hit him. She didn’t punch him, thus avoiding playing the game on his terms. Instead, she wrapped him in the lasso of truth and used its power to defeat him. Interestingly, while the lasso has retained its classic truth revealing elements in this incarnation of Wonder Woman, its added something new: Understanding. Wrapping themselves in the lasso is how Diana, Steve, Etta, and Barbara overcame their language barrier. It united them in a manner that allowed them to understand each other perfectly, despite their many differences. It may seem a little corny, but I absolutely love a story in which truth and understanding is the weapon the hero uses to defeat hate and war.

The rest of the issue was fun as well. Athena stepped in and revealed Ares’ fiendish master plan, so Wonder Woman and Steve went off and took care of that with ease. This resulted in another great scene for Diana; she was overcome with anger while fighting a group of terrorists and almost gave into a murderous impulse, but then she wrapped herself in her own lasso and the truth steeled her against the power of Ares’ lies. The fun continued in other ways as well, with the Etta/Barbara romantic subplot developing nicely, and for readers interested in some male eye candy, Nicola Scott had a lot of shirtless Steve Trevor in this issue. There was something for everyone, really. And the issue ended with a nice nod to Wonder Woman’s past, with an array of newspapers naming her “Wonder Woman” using different fonts that harkened back to the scripts used on the covers of Wonder Woman over the course of the series’ history.

All together, it was an excellent conclusion to a fantastic run that will go down as one of the best Wonder Woman stories of all time. It was well written and absolutely gorgeous, and it set the tone for who Wonder Woman is and what she means in today’s world. With such a good beginning, I can’t wait to see what’s next. Bilquis Evely, who drew the wonderful Barbara Ann Minerva standalone issue, is taking over the art for Scott on the new arc, “Godwatch,” a transition so perfect that it lessens the blow of Scott’s departure considerably. Wonder Woman‘s going to be good for a while, gang. It’s exciting times.

Wonder Woman #9 Review: Paradise Found?

October 26, 2016

ww9.jpg

I can’t not comment on this cover again, even though there’s lots of other stuff to dig into in this issue, because Steve Trevor looks like a straight up creeper. I said it when they first released it in the solicits and I’m saying it now; this is a very offputting cover. The dude is wigging me out. This is not the best way to advertise what is otherwise a pretty decent comic book, and one of the best installments of “The Lies” so far. It still doesn’t hold a candle to any of the “Year One” issues, all of which have been spectacular, but it’s a good outing for Greg Rucka and Liam Sharp that finally gets the ball rolling on what “The Lies” actually are. After four issues of the slightest of teases on “The Lies” front and a whole lot of Cheetah/Urzkartaga adventuring, things are finally happening! We’ll discuss them all, but first:

SPOILER ALERT!!

I’m about to full on ruin this whole issue!

Look away if you haven’t read it yet!

Don’t spoil yourself!

Let’s start at the beginning: Everyone’s back in America and the lengthy African escapade is done. Steve Trevor is filing his report, and Diana, Etta, and Barbara Ann are going shopping because Barbara’s been freed from her Cheetah guise and, presumably, has lost track of her wardrobe over the past several years in which she was a cat-creature and didn’t need any clothes. Even better, everyone’s finally talking about “The Lies.” They’re using satellites to try to locate Themyscira, and contemplating exactly where/how it exists. Apparently, it doesn’t have a literal location so much as a spiritual one, so the trick to finding it is to track down a spot where the divisions between the literal and spiritual world is thin.

Which they do! And the book ends with Wonder Woman returning to her mother and her home. The only problem is that it’s the blonde Hippolyta with the violent, awful Amazons from the early years of the New 52. Diana’s happy to see her mother, but it’s clear that something is amiss. First, the skies are all cloudy and red and violent, which is always an ominous sign. And second, Steve looks super confused. These are not the Amazons that  Steve remembers at all. We’ve saw his time with the Amazons in the new Wonder Woman #2, and it was a bright, happy place with lovely buildings and lots of colour and a brunette queen. This brutal looking place is not the utopia that he remembers.

Wonder Woman, on the other hand, remembers both, and potentially several other of her incarnations as well. Her memory’s gone screwy, and her past is a blur in her mind. While she’s glad to see her mother now, it seems likely that everything’s going to go sideways next month as we get to the heart of what’s really happening with “The Lies.”

The issue also introduced a few other interesting developments. First, Veronica Cale is back! She’s a villain that we really haven’t seen much since Rucka’s last run on Wonder Woman, and I’m glad to see her facing off against her Amazon foe again. Veronica still doesn’t care for Wonder Woman at all, and looks to be plotting to take her down. We only get a couple of pages with her, so I’m not sure what her involvement is in the weird CIA group that Steve, Etta, and Sasha Bordeaux work for. She might be running the whole show, or she may have a mole on the inside that she’s using for intel and to manipulate things. Time will tell. Whatever the case, Veronica Cale is involved on the inside, and that doesn’t bode well for Wonder Woman at all.

Luckily for Wonder Woman, this bad news is tempered by a bit of good news: She and Steve are getting romantic again. They have a lengthy discussion about their relationship over the years and her recent dalliance with Superman, and it all ends with a kiss, so it looks like those two crazy kids are finally together. I’m ambivalent on this development, really. Steve is fine and all, and this is a classic pairing, but the two of them together have always lacked a spark for me that other signature comic book romances capture so well. Lois Lane and Superman are often dynamite together, as are Catwoman and Batman (or Selina Kyle and Bruce Wayne), but Diana and Steve are okay at best. There’s just not a lot of excitement there, but perhaps Rucka will be the writer that finally sells me on them together. I do love what he’s doing with Steve in “Year One,” though it’s somehow not translating into “The Lies” Steve, who’s been a bit flat. Also, that goatee is terrible. Plus that creepy cover. Maybe with a shave and something more to do than be captured, Present Steve will grow on me and I’ll like him as much as I do Past Steve.

Ultimately, there was a lot going on in this issue, and the bigger story of “The Lies” is finally moving forward. The book still exhibited several of the weak spots that we’ve seen previously in this arc, though. For one thing, it’s still very slow. And needlessly so; that two page spread of Wonder Woman greeting folks in the mall seemed unnecessary. Naming all of the stores after past Wonder Woman creators was cute, but I don’t think that scene needed 10% of the issue’s real estate. On the plus side, Sharp was more on top of the art this month. The visuals were far less inconsistent than the past couple of outings, and there were some nice panels in the mix. It might be his most consistent outing since Wonder Woman #1.

I’m excited to see where the story is going next, which is a first for me reading “The Lies.” At the end of previous issues, I was mildly curious about where things were heading, but there wasn’t a lot of immediacy to the cliffhangers and when the next issue rolled around I wasn’t clamouring to read it. But now, I’m very much looking forward to Wonder Woman #11. We’re finally digging into “The Lies”! And I hope we get some answers soon.

Women at Marvel Comics Watch – December 2016 Solicits, 37 Women on 25 Books

October 6, 2016

womenatmarveldecember

Marvel’s had an impressive run with female creators throughout the fall with 30 or more women in every round of solicits we’ve seen for the autumn months. Now they’re set to cap the year with a new record high, bolstered by a slew of new titles with female writers and female lead characters. Let’s take a look at who’s doing what at Marvel in December 2016:

  • Afua Richardson: Black Panther: World of Wakanda #2 (cover)
  • Alitha E. Martinez: Black Panther: World of Wakanda #2 (interior art)
  • Alti Firmansyah: X-Men ’92 #10 (interior art)
  • Amy Reeder: Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur #14 (co-writer, cover)
  • Annie Wu: Star Wars: Classified #2 (variant cover)
  • Becky Cloonan: The Punisher #8 (writer)
  • Brittney L. Williams: Patsy Walker, a.k.a. Hellcat! #13 (interior art, cover)
  • Chynna Clugston-Flores: Gwenpool Holiday Special: Merry Mix-Up (co-writer, interior art)
  • Elizabeth Torque: The Mighty Captain Marvel #0 (cover)
  • Elsa Charretier: Star Wars: Classified #1 (variant cover)
  • Erica Henderson: Great Lakes Avengers #3 (variant cover), Gwenpool Holiday Special: Merry Mix-Up (variant cover), The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl #15 (interior art, cover)
  • Gurihiru: Gwenpool, the Unbelievable #9 (interior art)
  • Helen Chen: Silk #15 (cover)
  • Irene Strychalski: Silk #15 (interior art)
  • Jody Houser: Max Ride: Final Flight #4 (writer)
  • Kamome Shirahama: Star Wars: Classified #1 (variant cover)
  • Karla Pacheco: Gwenpool Holiday Special: Merry Mix-Up (co-writer)
  • Kate Leth: Patsy Walker, a.k.a. Hellcat! #13 (writer)
  • Kelly Thompson: Hawkeye #1 (writer)
  • Laura Braga: A Year of Marvels: The Uncanny #1 (interior art)
  • Margaret Stohl: The Mighty Captain Marvel #0 (writer)
  • Marguerite Sauvage: Black Panther: World of Wakanda #2 (variant cover), Hawkeye #1 (variant cover)
  • Mariko Tamaki: Hulk #1 (writer)
  • Myisha Haynes: Gwenpool Holiday Special: Merry Mix-Up (interior art)
  • Natacha Bustos: Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur #14 (interior art)
  • Nen Chang: Jessica Jones #3 (variant cover)
  • Nicole Perlman: Gamora #1 (writer)
  • Nik Virella: All-New Wolverine #15 (interior art)
  • Pia Guerra: Hulk #1 (variant cover)
  • Robin Furth: Dark Tower: The Drawing of the Three – The Sailor #3 (co-writer)
  • Roxane Gay: Black Panther: World of Wakanda #2 (co-writer)
  • Sara Pichelli: Spider-Man #11 (interior art, cover)
  • Stephanie Hans: Jessica Jones #3 (variant cover), Scarlet Witch #13 (interior art)
  • Tula Lotay: Gamora #1 (variant cover)
  • Veronica Fish: Spider-Woman #14 (interior art)
  • Yasmine Putri: Avengers #2.1 (variant cover)

All together, there are 37 different female creators set to work on 25 different books at Marvel this December, a gain of 6 women and 6 books from November. It’s also Marvel’s highest month for female creators since we starting keeping track a few years back, breaking a record they set earlier in the year. Looking back, 2016 has been a year of solid growth for women at Marvel. Back in February, there were only 18 different female creators working on Marvel books, and now that number has more than doubled.

A slew of new books made this record setting December possible. Margaret Stohl is writing The Mighty Captain Marvel, Mariko Tamaki is writing Hulk (which actually stars She-Hulk), Kelly Thompson is writing Hawkeye (the rad lady one), and Nicole Perlman is writing Gamora. It’s great to see such fantastic writers penning such awesome female characters, though it’d be fun to have some female artists in the mix, and I’d love to see Marvel let female creators work on more than just female-led books. Nonetheless, all of these new titles sound great.

Plus we’re getting a Gwenpool holiday special that’s got lots of women involved and should be a lot of fun. It also brings some new names to Marvel, including Chynna Clugston-Flores, Myisha Haynes, and Karla Pacheco; Clugston-Flores might have done a cover or something at some point a while back maybe? It’s hard to remember everyone. Either way, those three women are either new to Marvel or haven’t been around in a while.

Overall, Marvel is set to end the year on a high note. It’s nice to see that both major superhero publishers are going to close out 2016 with their best numbers yet; that’s a very encouraging sign for 2017. Hopefully Marvel can sustain these new highs for whatever the year brings, including their next inevitable round of relaunches. But for now, December looks to be a very strong showing for women at Marvel, both real and fictional, and the publisher has definitely progressed considerably over the past year.

Wonder Woman #7 Review: The Fall of Urzkartaga

September 28, 2016

ww7a

The gods lie. Every divine system has a trickster deity, of course, for good or ill or sometimes both, a Loki or a Puck or an Anansi. But more than that, systems of gods are a reflection of the humans who created them, and thus they have the same foibles and flaws. They tend to use their followers as tools for their own gain and glory, capriciously abusing their powers to satisfy their momentary whims. Zeus took different forms to trick women and have sex with them. Yahweh sent lying spirits to his prophets to deceive the Israelites when he wanted to punish them. Ishtar promised men wealth and power only to bleed them dry and leave them broken. The gods are deceivers.

This is what “The Lies” seems to be exploring, though Greg Rucka and Liam Sharp are delving into these themes in a world in which the gods are quite literally real. For us, the vast majority of the deities out there are just stories; even religious people believe in their particular pantheon and think the rest aren’t real. In the world of Wonder Woman, there are actual gods, and they’re just as bad as our mythologies make them sound.

Let’s dig into Wonder Woman #7, but first:

SPOILER ALERT!!

I am about to reveal key plot points from this issue!

Look away if you haven’t read it yet!

So we’ve been assuming that “The Lies” are about Wonder Woman and her deities, and whatever power has compelled her to remember false Amazons and a false pantheon. But we’ve barely scratched the surface of those lies four issues into the arc; instead, we’re spending a lot of time with the Cheetah and her complex, abusive relationship with her patron deity Urzkartaga, and it turns out that Barbara Ann Minerva has been the victim of lies as well. She was told that the scores of girls delivered to Urzkartaga were there to worship him, and that he imparted some of his power to one of them. She became the Cheetah, the Protector who enacted his will throughout his realm.

But Urzkarataga’s worshippers weren’t powerless followers. They were his wardens. The women held all the power, and Urzkartaga deceived them by convincing them that they had none, and that only through him could one of them approach the divine. It was a ruse to hide his true weakness and immobilize a potential threat: The girls could destroy him if they worked together to do so. Which they did, at the end of the issue when Wonder Woman exposed the truth. Urzkartaga was vanquished and Barbara Ann Minerva was freed of her Cheetah persona.

In last month’s installment of “The Lies,” the Cheetah told Wonder Woman, “Your paradise was made by your gods. Perhaps they play games with you the same way Urzkartaga plays with me.” With Urzkartaga’s deception now exposed, there may be an additional layer to that sentiment: Perhaps Wonder Woman’s gods lied to her the same way Urzkartaga lied to the Cheetah. And it will be interesting to see which gods were involved. The Urzkartaga plot relied on reinforcing patriarchal authority, ensuring that men were in charge and that girls were seen as expendable so that his chief weakness could be contained. Depending on which gods have deceived Diana, we could be looking at another critique of patriarchy once she gets to the bottom of “The Lies.” Which would make sense, given that in her false world the Amazons had turned against each other, female deities persecuted them, and Athena, the goddess of wisdom, was nowhere to be seem. Retconning this as a nefarious patriarchal plot would be a fascinating reimaging of the largely disastrous New 52 era.

Now, the Urzkartaga reveal was interesting, and I’m curious to see how it plays out for Wonder Woman, but the journey to get here was very long. Even if there are parallels with Diana’s gods, this was a slow story that, while it’s had it’s cool moments, has been a bit underwhelming. I like the ideas behind it, and I’m all for the rehabilitation of the Cheetah. The execution thereof just hasn’t worked so well for me. It’s not been bad, but it’s not been particularly compelling or entertaining, especially compared to the amazing work we’ve seen in the “Year One” storyline.

The art hasn’t helped things either. When I reviewed last month’s outing, I was critical of Sharp’s work and said it felt a bit rushed and sloppy. All of those elements are even more pronounced this month. There are a couple of really lovely panels where he clearly took his time, but there are scores more where the inking feels slapped on and rough. Moreover, backgrounds are nearly nonexistent. They’re in a cave, so there’s not a lot of exciting stuff that can be done, but the roots and such that run behind them are pretty slapdash. Sharp’s skills lie in his lush, detailed renderings, and the timeline of a monthly schedule doesn’t seem to be allowing him to do dig into his artwork in this way. Laura Martin does what she can with the colors, but it’s always awkward to put smooth, blended coloring over blocky, rough artwork. It just looks incongruous. I think she singlehandedly salvaged a few backgrounds with some cool effects that broke up the perpetual brown of the cave, but the overall visual appeal of the issue is limited.

Ultimately, if the Urzkartaga reveal is foreshadowing for what Wonder Woman is facing with her own deities, that’s a clever touch. But the execution thereof has been somewhat lacking. The story is too drawn out, the art is flagging, and everything good about the book is getting a bit lost in how it’s been presented. There are two issues left in the arc, of course, and what comes next may well prove that every seemingly slow step along the way thus far has been a key moment for the larger story. That would be lovely. But while there are a lot of cool ideas in the mix here and some genuinely great moments, the pacing and deteriorating artwork of the first four issues are stopping “The Lies” from fully living up to the intriguing vision behind it.

Women in Comics Statistics: DC and Marvel, July 2016 In Review

September 15, 2016

genderxlogo

My latest “Gendercrunching” column is up at Bleeding Cool, and DC’s overall percentage of female creator ticked up yet again as they bested a stagnant Marvel for the second straight month.

DC had 18.4% female creators, a gain of 0.9% that marked their fourth straight month of growth and took them to their highest total of the year. Marvel’s overall percentage of female creators rose only slightly, gaining 0.1% to hit 15.7%, a mid-level performance for the publisher that was several points down from their recent highs.

We also took a look at female characters in Big Two comics; DC had 34.1% female characters across their covers, their highest total in three years, while Marvel slipped down slightly to 30.2%, another mid-level performance. In terms of series headliners, male-led books took a tumble as team books surged for DC while Marvel’s numbers stayed about the same, with male-led books comprising roughly half of their line.

Head over to Bleeding Cool for the full numbers and all of the stats fun!


%d bloggers like this: