Posts Tagged ‘Claire Roe’

Women & NB Creators at Marvel Comics, October 2019 Solicits: 30 Creators on 29 Books

September 19, 2019

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Marvel looks to hold steady across the board with their October solicits. There aren’t any huge changes from their September numbers, which is unfortunate given that the September numbers were a definite step down from what’s been a stellar year of female and non-binary creator representation at the publisher. Let’s take a look at who’s doing what at Marvel this October:

  • Alyssa Wong: Aero #4 (co-writer), Future Fight Firsts: Crescent and Io #1 (writer), Future Fight Firsts: Luna Snow #1 (writer), Future Fight Firsts: White Fox #1 (writer)
  • Aneke: Age of Conan: Valeria #3 (interior art)
  • Ashley Witter: Star Wars: Doctor Aphra #37 (cover)
  • Becky Cloonan: Bizarre Adventures #1 (co-writer, interior art)
  • Belen Ortega: The Punisher #16 (variant cover)
  • Carmen Carnero: Captain Marvel #11 (interior art)
  • Claire Roe: Fearless #4 (interior art)
  • Colleen Doran: Star Wars: Doctor Aphra Annual #3 (variant cover)
  • Elsa Charretier: Star Wars: Doctor Aphra Annual #3 (interior art, cover)
  • Emanuela Lupacchino: Valkyrie: Jane Foster #4 (variant cover)
  • Erica Henderson: The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl #49 (cover)
  • Eve L. Ewing: Ironheart #11 (writer)
  • Jen Bartel: Loki #4 (variant cover)
  • Jenny Frison: Fearless #4 (variant cover)
  • Jody Houser: The Web of Black Widow #2 (writer)
  • Kei Zama: Death’s Head #4 (interior art)
  • Kelly Thompson: Amazing Spider-Man: Full Circle #1 (co-writer), Captain Marvel #11 (writer)
  • Leah Williams: Gwenpool Strikes Back #3 (writer), The Amazing Mary Jane #1 (writer)
  • Meredith Finch: Age of Conan: Valeria #3 (writer)
  • Mirka Andolfo: Miles Morales: Spider-Man #11 (variant cover)
  • Peach Momoko: Aero #4 (variant cover)
  • Rachael Stott: Amazing Spider-Man: Full Circle #1 (interior art)
  • Rainbow Rowell: Runaways #26 (writer)
  • Sana Takeda: Future Fight Firsts: Crescent and Io #1 (variant cover), Future Fight Firsts: Luna Snow #1 (variant cover), Future Fight Firsts: White Fox #1 (variant cover)
  • Sara Pichelli: House of X #6 (variant cover), Spider-Man #2 (interior art, variant cover)
  • Seanan McGuire: Fearless #4 (writer), Ghost-Spider #3 (writer)
  • Stacey Lee: Spider-Verse #1 (interior art)
  • Stephanie Hans: The Web of Black Widow #2 (variant cover)
  • Tini Howard: Death’s Head #4 (writer), Doctor Strange Annual #1 (co-writer), Excalibur #1 (writer), Strikeforce #2 (writer)
  • Yasmine Putri: Fearless #4 (cover)

All together there are 30 female creators set to work on 29 different books at Marvel in October, the same number of creators as in September on two more books. As best as I can tell, there are no non-binary creators in this round of solicits, a rarity for Marvel as of late. Very little has changed from September, despite the fact that we’re starting to see some big changes at Marvel as House of X and Powers of X wrap up and start a new era of X-books.

Marvel’s only put out one more book in October than September, meaning that 29 of their 89 books had female creator representation this month. That’s a total of 33%, a jump of two points from last month. It’s a minor change, but one in a positive direction at least. Still, that’s where DC’s at right now. Marvel’s advantage is this proportional metric has long past now.

We’ve got a couple of new names this month, including Alyssa Wong who is writing or co-writing a whopping FOUR books in October. That’s a massive debut. We’ve also got a variant cover from Belen Ortega, who is new to me. Everyone else is someone we’ve seen in some capacity over the past few months.

For new books, the aforementioned X-books are starting to roll out now. I’m not going to go through them all, but suffice it to say if there’s an X-lady you like, she’s probably on a team somewhere this month or next. It’s a pile of teams. There’s a female-led Excalibur title now, though, which looks great! The Amazing Mary Jane is launching this month too, and we’ve also got a series of Future Fight Firsts one-shots that I believe tie into some sort of Marvel mobile game, and they have a lot of female leads.

Overall, October looks to be a steady month for Marvel. The numbers haven’t bounced back, but nor have they dropped. While the November numbers will paint a fuller picture, it looks like Marvel’s strong run may have ended for now.

Women & NB Creators at Marvel Comics, September 2019 Solicits: 30 Creators on 27 Books

September 12, 2019

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As we continue our catching up, September marks a slight drop for female and non-binary creators at Marvel. The publisher has maintained a relatively impressive level of representation for some time, and this may well be a momentary blip. That being said, consistency in representation is out of character for Marvel, so we’ll have to see what happens over the rest of the fall. For now, let’s take a look at who is doing what at Marvel this September:

  • Alitha E. Martinez: Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur #47 (interior art)
  • Amanda Conner: Marvel Comics #1001 (interior art)
  • Amy Reeder: Marvel Comics #1001 (co-writer)
  • Aneke: Age of Conan: Valeria #2 (interior art)
  • Anna Rud: Marvel Team-Up #6 (cover)
  • Ashley Witter: Star Wars: Doctor Aphra #36 (cover)
  • Audrey Loeb: Marvel Comics #1001 (co-writer)
  • Carmen Carnero: Captain Marvel #10 (interior art)
  • Claire Roe: Fearless #3 (interior art)
  • Emanuela Lupacchino: Age of Conan: Valeria #2 (variant cover), Ghost-Spider Annual #1 (cover)
  • Erica Henderson: The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl #48 (cover)
  • Eve L. Ewing: Ironheart #10 (writer)
  • Jen Bartel: Marvel Tales: Black Panther #1 (cover)
  • Jenny Frison: Fearless #3 (variant cover)
  • Jody Houser: The Web of Black Widow #1 (writer), Wolverine Annual #1 (writer)
  • Kei Zama: Death’s Head #3 (interior art)
  • Kelly Thompson: Captain Marvel #10 (writer)
  • Leah Williams: Absolute Carnage: Avengers #1 (writer), Gwenpool Strikes Back #2 (writer)
  • Meghan Hetrick: The Web of Black Widow #1 (variant cover)
  • Meredith Finch: Age of Conan: Valeria #2 (writer)
  • Natacha Bustos: Marvel Comics #1001 (interior art)
  • Peach Momoko: Silver Surfer: Black #4 (variant cover)
  • Rainbow Rowell: Runaways #25 (writer)
  • Sabine Rich: Agents of Atlas #2 (variant cover)
  • Sara Pichelli: House of X #4 (variant cover), House of X #5 (variant cover), Spider-Man #1 (interior art, cover)
  • Seanan McGuire: Fearless #3 (writer), Ghost-Spider #1 (writer)
  • Stephanie Hans: Valkyrie: Jane Foster #3 (variant cover)
  • Tini Howard: Death’s Head #3 (writer), Strikeforce #1 (writer), Thanos #6 (writer)
  • Vita Ayala: Ghost-Spider Annual #1 (writer), Marvel Comics #1001 (co-writer)
  • Yasmine Putri: Fearless #3 (cover), Savage Sword of Conan #9 (variant cover)

All together, there are 30 different female and non-binary creators set to work on 27 different books in September, seven fewer creators but only one fewer book. The drop in creators in considerable, with a decline of nearly a fifth. That’s nothing to scoff at. The number of books remains more or less consistent, though.

With female and non-binary creators working on 27 of Marvel’s 88 books in September, that gives us representation across 31% of the line. This was 33% in August, so it’s a slight step down that, when combined with the big drop in creators, makes September a disappointing month for the publisher. Nothing catastrophic, but certainly a step down from what’s been a relatively strong run as of late.

It’s a quiet month for new creators as well. There don’t seem to be any brand new names, though there are a few returning creators from way back. We haven’t seen Meghan Hetrick or Audrey Loeb in some time, years even, so it’s cool to have them back in the mix. And while we’re used to seeing Sabine Rich at DC, this might be her first credit in the Marvel solicits, which is fun.

For new books, The Web of Black Widow has everyone’s favourite spy starring in some new adventures. If Scarlett Johansson’s got you down, you can still enjoy Black Widow comics at least. There are also some great female characters in the new Strikeforce book, including Angela, Monica Rambeau, and Spider-Woman.

Overall, Marvel’s numbers for female and non-binary creators are slightly down from their recent levels in this round of solicits. It was inevitable, to some degree. The numbers tend to shift far more often than we’ve seen from Marvel this year. Time will tell if September marks a temporary slide or a bigger change at the publisher.

Women & NB Creators at Marvel Comics Watch, August 2019 Solicits: 37 Creators on 28 Books

July 26, 2019

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August is a big month for Marvel, with a “landmark” thousandth issue from a massive team of creators set to hit comic shops. The numbering is completely arbitrary, and it’s not even a real series. Marvel saw the success DC had with its legitimate Action Comics #1000 and Detective Comics #1000 and, since there are no Marvel books anywhere close to a thousand issues yet, just decided to make something up and have their own Marvel Comics #1000. It’s a goofy gimmick that will sell a ton of copies because that’s how the comics business works, and it’s set to feature a bunch of female creators, as you can see below. Let’s take a look at who’s doing what at Marvel this August:

  • Alexandra Petri: She-Hulk Annual #1 (writer)
  • Alitha E. Martinez: Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur #46 (interior art)
  • Amanda Conner: Gwenpool Strikes Back #1 (variant cover), Invisible Woman #2 (variant cover)
  • Aneke: Age of Conan: Valeria #1 (interio art)
  • Anna Rud: Marvel Team-Up #5 (cover)
  • Ashley Witter: Star Wars: Doctor Aphra #1 (cover)
  • Becky Cloonan: Marvel Monsters #1 (interior art)
  • Carmen Carnero: Captain Marvel #9 (interior art)
  • Claire Roe: Fearless #2 (interior art)
  • Dana Schwartz: Deadpool Annual #1 (writer)
  • Elsa Charretier: Power Pack: Grow Up! #1 (variant cover)
  • Emanuela Lupacchino: Absolute Carnage: Mile Morales #1 (variant cover), Gwenpool Strikes Back #1 (variant cover)
  • Erica Henderson: The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl #47 (cover)
  • Eve L. Ewing: Ironheart #9 (writer), Marvel Comics #1000 (creator)
  • Gail Simone: Marvel Comics #1000 (creator)
  • Gurihiru: Gwenpool Strikes Back #1 (variant cover), Power Pack: Grow Up! #1 (interior art)
  • Irene Koh: Marvel Comics #1000 (creator)
  • Irina Nordsol: Doctor Strange #18 (cover)
  • Jen Bartel: Black Cat #3 (variant cover), Marvel Comics #1000 (creator), Marvel Tales: X-Men #1 (cover)
  • Jenny Frison: Fearless #2 (variant cover)
  • Jody Houser: Star Wars: Tie Fighter #5 (writer)
  • June Brigman: Power Pack: Grow Up! #1 (interior art, cover)
  • Karla Pacheco: Fearless #2 (co-writer)
  • Kathryn Immonen: Marvel Comics #1000 (creator)
  • Kei Zama: Death’s Head #2 (interior art)
  • Kelly Sue DeConnick: Marvel Comics #1000 (creator)
  • Kelly Thompson: Captain Marvel #9 (writer), Marvel Comics #1000 (creator)
  • Leah Williams: Gwenpool Strikes Back #1 (writer)
  • Louise Simonson: Power Pack: Grow Up! #1 (writer)
  • Meredith Finch: Age of Conan: Valeria #1 (writer)
  • Mirka Andolfo: She-Hulk Annual #1 (cover)
  • Rainbow Rowell: Marvel Comics #1000 (creator), Runaways #24 (writer)
  • Sara Pichelli: House of X #2 (variant cover), House of X #3 (variant cover)
  • Seanan McGuire: Fearless #2 (co-writer), Ghost-Spider #1 (writer)
  • Tini Howard: Death’s Head #2 (writer), Marvel Comics #1000 (creator), Thanos #5 (writer)
  • Yasmine Putri: Absolute Carnage: Lethal Projectors #1 (variant cover), Fearless #2 (cover), House of X #2 (variant cover), Powers of X #2 (variant cover), Star Wars: Tie Fighter #5 (variant cover)

Altogether, there are 37 different female creators set to work on 28 different books in August, one fewer creator than in July on two fewer books. As best I can tell, there are no non-binary creators listed in this round of solicits. It’s a slight drop in both counts, but Marvel’s putting out fewer books this month so we’re in the same ballpark as before as the publisher continues to maintain its high level of female creators. Marvel is on quite a run right now.

We’re still seeing the concentration of female creators we had last month, though. Marvel’s set to put out 85 books in August, and with women working on 28 of them that means the publisher has female creators on 33% of the line. This is a slight step up from July’s 32%, but still below the 40% they posted in June. While the number of female creators remains high, they’re not spread out as much across the line right now.

There are some new names in the mix in August. We’ve got two new female writers with Alexandra Petri and Dana Schwartz, adding an already strong lineup. There are a lot of returning favourites, as well, including legends like June Brigman and Louise Simonson, and it’s been a while since we’ve seen Kathryn Immonen.

For new books, Marvel Comics #1000 is obviously the big one, and it’s set to feature darn near every Marvel character ever, so there’ll certainly be some ladies in the mix. For new books, we’ve got a Gwenpool mini-series and a relaunched Gwen Stacy book, Ghost-Spider, that’s basically just the same book and creative team with a slightly different title and new numbering. There are also team books like Agents of Atlas, Future Foundation, and Power Pack: Grow Up! that have female characters involved.

All together, it’s another solid outing for Marvel. With so many books coming out each month, the jobs are plentiful and they’re filling them with a lot of female creators. Proportionally, it’s not the best numbers we’ve ever seen because Marvel’s been at a comparable level before with much fewer books. But still, this is a relatively strong run, and it’s great to see so many wonderful female creators doing excellent work each month.

Women & NB Creators at Marvel Comics Watch, July 2019 Solicits: 38 Creators on 30 Books

June 20, 2019

womenatmarvelJULY

Marvel’s July 2019 solicits may mark the highest number of female and non-binary creators we’ve seen from either Big Two publisher in the several years I’ve been doing these pieces. I say “may” in part because I’ve done quite a lot of them and skimming back through years and years of posts to check seems deeply onerous. But also in part because while we’ve definitely been in the high 30s before, it was at a time when DC and Marvel were putting out fewer books, and right now Marvel is putting out SO many books. Thus, this may well be the biggest number we’ve seen (it’s certainly very close to it) but on a per capita basis I doubt it would hold up as the best month ever. Nonetheless, it’s quite good! Let’s take a look at who’s doing what at Marvel in July:

  • Alitha E. Martinez: Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur #45 (interior art)
  • Amanda Conner: Captain Marvel #8 (cover)
  • Anna Rud: Marvel Team-Up #4 (cover)
  • Ashley Witter: Star Wars: Doctor Aphra #34 (cover)
  • Audrey Mok: Marvel Rising #5 (cover)
  • Carmen Carnero: Captain Marvel #8 (interior art), Star Wars: Target Vader #1 (variant cover)
  • Claire Roe: Fearless #1 (interior art)
  • Elsa Charretier: Star Wars: Age of Resistance Special #1 (interior art)
  • Emanuela Lupacchino: Loki #1 (variant cover)
  • Erica Henderson: The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl #46 (cover)
  • Eve L. Ewing: Ironheart #8 (writer)
  • G. Willow Wilson: Star Wars: Age of Resistance Special #1 (co-writer)
  • Gail Simone: Domino: Hotshots #5 (writer)
  • Gurihiru: The Unstoppable Wasp #10 (interior art)
  • Jen Bartel: Marvel Tales: Captain America #1 (cover), Marvel Tales: Hulk #1 (cover)
  • Jenny Frison: Age of Conan: Belit #5 (variant cover), Fearless #1 (variant cover)
  • Jody Houser: Star Wars: Tie Fighter #4 (writer)
  • Karla Pacheco: Punisher Annual #1 (writer)
  • Kate Niemcyzyk: Age of Conan: Belit #5 (interior art)
  • Kei Zama: Death’s Head #1 (artist)
  • Kelly Thompson: Captain Marvel #8 (writer)
  • Kirbi Fagan: Shuri #10 (cover)
  • Leah Williams: Fearless #1 (co-writer)
  • Magdalene Visaggio: Ms. Marvel Annual #1 (writer)
  • Mirka Andolfo: Aero #1 (variant cover)
  • Nilah Magruder: Marvel Rising #5 (writer)
  • Nnedi Okorafor: Shuri #10 (writer)
  • Rachael Stott: Shuri #10 (interior art)
  • Rainbow Rowell: Runaways #23 (writer)
  • Sana Takeda: Age of Conan: Belit #5 (cover)
  • Sara Pichelli: House of X #1 (variant cover)
  • Seanan McGuire: Fearless #1 (co-writer), Spider-Gwen: Ghost-Spider #10 (writer)
  • Stacey Lee: Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge #4 (variant cover), The Unstoppable Wasp #10 (cover)
  • Stephanie Hans: Invisible Woman #1 (variant cover)
  • Tini Howard: Age of Conan: Belit #5 (writer), Death’s Head #1 (writer), Secret Warps: Iron Hammer Annual #1 (co-writer), Thanos #4 (writer)
  • Vita Ayala: Age of X-Man: Prisoner X #5 (writer)
  • Yasmine Putri: Fearless #1 (cover)

That is a very long list! All together, there are 38 different female and non-binary creators scheduled to work on 30 different comic books at Marvel in July, three more creators than in June though on six fewer books. That is the one thing I did notice when compiling this month’s numbers, that there was more clumping than usual, i.e. several women and non-binary creators on one book rather than spread out more across the line. There’s one case in particular where this makes sense, the new Fearless mini that features all female characters and an all-female creator line up. But generally, things were more concentrated this month.

We saw that especially when we look at the number of books that are coming out, as we’ve been doing lately to make up the discrepancy between DC and Marvel’s publishing slate. Marvel’s putting out 93 new books in July, so with female and non-binary creators on 30 of them, that gives us a representation percentage of 32%, a noticeable step down from June’s 40%. This total also puts both Big Two publishers in the same ballpark right now in terms of representation across the line, though Marvel’s still got a significant lead in creators overall even when adjusted for output.

For new names, we’ve got nothing. Everyone listed above has worked at Marvel before. We’ve got some returning favourites, though, with a few folks we haven’t seen in a little while. Or, in the case of Karla Pacheco and Kei Zama, nearly three years! Also, Marvel’s debuting a new line of Asian characters written and drawn by Asian creators, and while I’ve tracked down several of them, a few don’t seem to have an English language presence online to allow me to read up on them and determine their gender preference, so we’ve got a few question marks this month.

In terms of female characters, the aforementioned Fearless looks like it’s going to be pretty dang cool. We’ve also got a new Valkyrie with Jane Foster taking on the mantle, which I’ve got mixed feelings about. She’s such a good Thor, and I want movie Valkyrie to be comics Valkyrie now! But still, it looks decent. The Invisible Woman’s got a new book as well, with an all-male creative team apart from a variant cover, and Aero is a female-led book that’s part of this new Asian heroes lineup.

Overall, female and non-binary creator representation at Marvel is quite strong, though with so many books the impressive numbers don’t hold up quite as well on a per capita basis. Still, this level of consistency isn’t something we’re used to seeing from Marvel, and keeping the numbers so high for so long, regardless of the plethora of books, is quite a feat, even with lots of room to grow yet.

Wonder Woman Annual #1 Review: A Delightful Assortment of Tales!

May 31, 2017

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Annuals are tricky comic books. They cost more than a regular issue, so readers expect some extra bang for their buck. They also tend to be disconnected from the ongoing arc(s) in the main series, so it’s easy for readers to question their relevance. An annual is an expensive collection of standalone stories, most of which aren’t by the usual creative team, and it’s never a surprise when they invariably sell fewer copies than the series’ regular issues do. I know I’ve skipped all sorts of annuals over the years. But this one I was excited for. It’s a “Year One” reunion  with Greg Rucka and Nicola Scott back together, and that alone is worth the price of admission. So much so that I’d completely forgotten who else was in the book, to be quite honest. Those stories turned out to be fun as well, though! I mean, there’s one where Wonder Woman plays fetch with a kaiju. That’s quality entertainment. We’ll get to it all, but first:

SPOILER ALERT!!

I am about to reveal important details from this very enjoyable comic book!

Do yourself a favour and go buy it now!

The first story is “And Then There Were Three” by Rucka and Scott. It was nice to have them back together after their stellar “Year One” run, and it was also great to have Rucka writing Batman and Superman again. He’s done fantastic work with both characters in the past, and in his hands they just felt right. DC’s trinity has been a little off kilter for me since the New 52 relaunch in 2011, and Rucka writing all three of them took me back to the characters as I know them best.

While the story tied into “Year One,” it didn’t have anything in the way of surprising revelations or information that added a key piece to the larger mysteries that have swirled throughout the “Rebirth” run. It was tangential, the story of Wonder Woman’s first meeting with Batman and Superman, but wow is it good. There are no big fights or drama, just great banter and a perfect distillation of their group dynamic. Superman teasing Batman is a dang delight, Alfred and Lois Laneare in the mix and amusingly so, and the end of the story, with Batman in awe of the pure heroism and love for the world at the core of Wonder Woman, is a great moment.

Plus it’s absolutely gorgeous. I wish Nicola Scott could draw Wonder Woman forever, and that Romulo Fajardo Jr. would be her eternal colorist. Scott has such a good handle on Wonder Woman, and captures her beautifully. She’s no slouch with Batman or Superman either! The entire story is exquisitely drawn from start to finish, from Metropolis to the Batcave to the Nevada desert, and makes for a wonderful opener to the annual.

Up next is “In Defense of Truth and Justice” by Vita Ayala and Claire Roe with colors by Jordie Bellaire. Ayala is an up an coming write at DC, and Roe is fresh off a run on Batgirl and the Birds of Prey. Their story pits Wonder Woman against the forces of Markovia as she works to save King Shark from an undeserved execution. I always love when Wonder Woman defends a villain who, though guilty of various crimes, is being treated an unfairly and needs help. These tales capture the compassionate core of the character, and Ayala and Roe do that well here, with some excellent action in the mix too. It’s a well executed story all around, with a great ending in which Wonder Woman tries to set King Shark on the right path moving forward with the help of one of her aquatic friends.

“The Curse and the Honor” by Michael Moreci and Stephanie Hans is just so pretty. The story itself is fine; the location is unnamed, but it looks like Wonder Woman is in a Japanese village, where she gives a warrior who has absorbed vengeful spirits the honourable death he deserves. But the art is stunning. Stephanie Hans always delivers amazing visuals, and this story is no exception. It’s a heavy tale, set in the winter so that Wonder Woman and her red cape appear in stark contrast to her surroundings. The art is lush and pretty, not so much finely detailed as atmospheric and moody. It is lovely all around; bringing in Stephanie Hans on this one was a very smart move from DC.

Continuing the Japanese influence, the final story is “The Last Kaiju,” written by Collin Kelly and Jackson Lanzing with art by David Lafuente and colors from John Rauch. As a giant kaiju approached a city on the Pacific coast, A.R.G.U.S. wants to light it up but Wonder Woman swoops in to deal with it directly. After a bit of fisticuffs, she ties it up in her golden lasso and learns that it’s not some mindless monster but a lost and lonely creature. Wonder Woman then defends the creature, flies it to Dinosaur Island where it can make friends, and they all play catch with a giant log. It’s cute and fun and again captured Wonder Woman’s compassionate core. Just like with King Shark, Wonder Woman willingly put herself in harm’s way to defend someone that no one else thought was worthy of defending. That’s always a great message for a Wonder Woman comic, and it’s nicely executed here.

All together, this was a pretty swell annual and definitely worth picking up. I came for Rucka and Scott’s take on DC’s trinity, but everything else was enjoyable as well. Plus it was great to see a wide variety of art styles and tones in the stories. It was an eclectic mix that all worked together to celebrate Wonder Woman’s heart and heroism. With the Wonder Woman movie coming just days from now, this is a fitting book to have on the shelves for new or returning fans.

Women at DC Comics – February 2017 Solicits, 27 Women on 21 Books

December 1, 2016

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DC’s female creator representation is set to remain steady albeit somewhat below their recent highs as the new year unfolds. The February 2017 solicits have some fun new books and the numbers are largely in line with the January solicits. DC’s posted higher numbers, but they’ve posted far, far lower too. Let’s take a look at who’s doing what at DC this February:

  • Amanda Conner: Harley Quinn #13 (co-writer, cover), Harley Quinn #14 (co-writer, cover)
  • Becky Cloonan: Gotham Academy: Second Semester #6 (writer, cover), Shade, the Changing Girl #5 (cover)
  • Bilquis Evely: Wonder Woman #16 (interior art, cover)
  • Cecil Castellucci: Shade, the Changing Girl #5 (writer)
  • Chynna Clugston Flores: Shade, the Changing Girl #5 (interior art)
  • Claire Roe: Batgirl and the Birds of Prey #7 (interior art)
  • Elena Casagrande: Vigilante: Southland #2 (interior art)
  • Emanuela Lupacchino: Green Lanterns #16 (variant cover), Green Lanterns #17 (variant cover)
  • Gail Simone: Clean Room #16 (writer)
  • Heather Nuhfer: Teen Titans Go! #20 (co-writer)
  • Hope Larson: Batgirl #8 (writer)
  • Jenny Frison: Clean Room #16 (cover), Shade, the Changing Girl #5 (variant cover), Wonder Woman #16 (variant cover), Wonder Woman #17 (variant cover)
  • Jody Houser: Mother Panic #4 (writer)
  • Joelle Jones: Supergirl: Being Super #2 (interior art, cover)
  • Julie Benson: Batgirl and the Birds of Prey #7 (co-writer)
  • Kamome Shirahama: Batgirl and the Birds of Prey #7 (variant cover)
  • Marguerite Bennett: Batwoman: Rebirth #1 (co-writer), DC Comics Bombshells #22 (writer)
  • Mariko Tamaki: Supergirl: Being Super #2 (writer)
  • Marley Zarcone: Shade, the Changing Girl #5 (interior art)
  • Mirka Andolfo: DC Comics Bombshells #22 (interior art)
  • Msassyk: Gotham Academy: Second Semester #6 (interior art)
  • Sandra Hope: Gotham Academy: Second Semester #6 (inker)
  • Sarah Vaughn: Deadman: Dark Mansion of Forbidden Love #3 (writer)
  • Shawna Benson: Batgirl and the Birds of Prey #7 (co-writer)
  • Stephanie Hans: Deadman: Dark Mansion of Forbidden Love #3 (cover)
  • Tula Lotay: All Star Batman #7 (interior art, cover, variant cover), Everafter: From the Pages of Fables #6 (cover), The Wild Storm #1 (variant cover)
  • Yasmine Putri: The Hellblazer #7 (variant cover)

All together, there are 27 different female creators set to work on 21 different books in February 2017, one more female creator than in January though 3 fewer books. Both months of 2017 have been in the high 20s, but DC’s solicits were in the low 30s at the end of 2016. It’s a light step down for the publisher, and the continuing unfolding of the second phase of “Rebirth” doesn’t seem to be growing the female creator ranks yet.

Part of the reason for the numbers not changing much is that there aren’t really any new women in the list above. It’s a lots of returning favourites and people we’ve seen recently; everyone’s a regular. There are folks in new gigs, however. Bilquis Evely is taking over as the artist on the even-numbered issues of Wonder Woman, and Marguerite Bennett is penning a Batwoman series.

Speaking of, there are a few new books with solid female character representation. Batwoman is the only female-led solo title set to debut; it premieres with a “Rebirth” issue this month, and then the regular series should launch in March. A couple of new team books have a lot of women in the mix as well, including The Wild Storm reboot, which name checks Angela Spica, Jenny Sparks, and Voodoo in the solicit, and the new Justice League of America, which counts Black Canary, Killer Frost, and Vixen as members.

Overall, is a fairly steady month for DC, with relatively decent female creator representation. The drop in the number of books is a bit disheartening; that’s the lowest number of titles since September. But the ranks as a whole are holding firm, and remain above where DC was when “Rebirth” began . DC’s previously shown that they’re capable of higher numbers, and perhaps the second wave of “Rebirth” will continue and help the publisher reach and perhaps surpass those totals.

Women At DC Comics Watch – December 2016 Solicits, 33 Women on 23 Books

October 4, 2016

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In my report on the November solicits, I noted that it seemed unlikely that DC’s number of female creators would be in the low 30s again come December. There were a lot of one-shots and variant cover gigs, and those numbers are hard to sustain month-to-month. But DC did it, and has posted a strong lineup of female creators to end the year. Let’s take a look at who’s doing what at DC Comics in December 2016:

  • Amanda Conner: Harley Quinn #9 (co-writer, cover), Harley Quinn #10 (co-writer, cover)
  • Becky Cloonan: Gotham Academy: Second Semester #4 (co-writer), Shade, The Changing Girl #3 (cover)
  • Cecil Castellucci: Shade, The Changing Girl #3 (writer)
  • Claire Roe: Batgirl and the Birds of Prey #5 (interior art)
  • Elena Casagrande: Vigilante: Southland #3 (interior art)
  • Emanuela Lupacchino: Green Lanterns #12 (variant cover), Green Lanterns #13 (variant cover)
  • Gail Simone: Clean Room #15 (written)
  • Heather Nuhfer: Teen Titans Go! #19 (co-writer)
  • Holly Black: Lucifer #13 (co-writer)
  • Hope Larson: Batgirl #6 (writer)
  • Jenny Frison: Clean Room #15 (cover), Wonder Woman #12 (variant cover), Wonder Woman #13 (variant cover)
  • Jody Houser: Mother Panic #2 (writer)
  • Joelle Jones: Supergirl: Being Super #1 (interior art, cover)
  • Julie Benson: Batgirl and the Birds of Prey #5 (co-writer)
  • K. Perkins: DC Rebirth Holiday Special #1 (co-writer)
  • Kamome Shirahama: Batgirl and the Birds of Prey #5 (variant cover)
  • Laura Braga: DC Comics Bombshells #20 (interior art)
  • Marguerite Bennett: DC Comics Bombshells #20 (writer)
  • Marguerite Sauvage: DC Comics Bombshells #20 (interior art), The Flintstones #6 (variant cover)
  • Mariko Tamaki: Supergirl: Being Super #1 (writer)
  • Marley Zarcone: Shade, The Changing Girl #3 (interior art)
  • Mirka Andolfo: DC Comics Bombshells #20 (interior art)
  • Msassyk: Gotham Academy: Second Semester #4 (interior art)
  • Nicola Scott: Wonder Woman #12 (interior art, cover)
  • Pia Guerra: The Hellblazer #5 (interior art)
  • Sandra Hope: Gotham Academy: Second Semester #4 (inker)
  • Sanya Anwar: Clean Room #15 (interior art)
  • Sarah Vaughn: Deadman: Dark Mansion of Forbidden Love #2 (writer)
  • Shawna Benson: Batgirl and the Birds of Prey #5 (co-writer)
  • Stephanie Hans: Deadman: Dark Mansion of Forbidden Love #2 (cover)
  • Tula Lotay: Everafter: From the Pages of Fables #4 (cover)
  • Vita Ayala: DC Rebirth Holiday Special #1 (co-writer), Suicide Squad Most Wanted: El Diablo and Amanda Waller #5 (co-writer)
  • Yasmine Putri: The Hellblazer #5 (variant cover)

All together, there are 33 different female creators set to work on 23 different books at DC this December, the same number of women as in November and one more book. The total also ties DC’s highest number of the year, and it’s an encouraging sign for 2017 that DC is set to end 2016 with two very good months. With the second wave of “Rebirth” just around the corner, hopefully the publisher can keep these numbers going.

December looks a lot like November across the board: a core group of creators, plus a few one-shots and variant covers. One-shots aren’t sustained work, but DC’s mixing things up with their variant covers as of late. Instead of rotating in different artists each month, artists seem to be sticking with a book for an extended period of time. Emanuela Lupacchino, for example, has been doing variants for Green Lanterns since it launched in June. What used to be a one-time job has turned into steady work, and it’s helping keep DC’s female creator ranks high.

December’s not a huge month for female characters, but there are a couple of fun new books in the mix. The biggest is Supergirl: Being Super by Mariko Tamaki and Joelle Jones; it looks fantastic, and with two amazing creators in the mix it should be a lot of fun. We’ve also got the DC Rebirth Holiday Special with stories starring Batwoman and Wonder Woman, and the beginning of Justice League vs. Suicide Squad, which will feature all of the female members on both teams.

Overall, DC is set to end the year on a good note. Things were looking bad mid-way through the year; DC could barely hit 20 female creators a month in the early days of their “Rebirth” initiative. But things have picked up throughout the fall and DC is going to close 2016 with the best numbers we’ve seen from them over the past five years. There’s always still room to grow; women remain a small minority at nearly every level of production. But progress is slowly being made, and things are looking up.


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