Posts Tagged ‘DC Comics’

Women at DC Comics Watch – April 2017 Solicits, 26 Female Creators on 24 Books

February 17, 2017

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Female creator representation in DC’s April 2017 solicits is about par for the course for the year thus far. DC’s been hovering around the mid-20s for months, an okay level but noticeably below their recent highs last fall and Marvel’s current highs. Given the progress both major superhero publishers have made in expanding their female creator ranks over the past few years, DC’s run in 2017 thus far is slightly underwhelming. Let’s take a look at who’s doing what at DC in April 2017:

  • Afua Richardson: All Star Batman #9 (interior art and cover)
  • Amanda Conner: Harley Quinn #17 (co-writer, cover), Harley Quinn #18 (co-writer, cover)
  • Aneke: DC Comics Bombshells #25 (interior art)
  • Becky Cloonan: Gotham Academy: Second Semester #8 (co-writer), Shade, the Changing Girl #7 (cover)
  • Bilquis Evely: Wonder Woman #20 (interior art, cover)
  • Cecil Castellucci: Shade, the Changing Girl #7 (writer)
  • Eleanora Carlini: Green Arrow #20 (interior art)
  • Emanuela Lupacchino: Green Lanterns #20 (variant cover), Green Lanterns #21 (variant cover), Supergirl #8 (cover), Trinity #8 (interior art)
  • Gail Simone: Clean Room #18 (writer)
  • Hope Larson: Batgirl #10 (writer)
  • Jenny Frison: Clean Room #18 (cover), Wonder Woman #20 (variant cover), Wonder Woman #21 (variant cover)
  • Jody Houser: Mother Panic #6 (writer)
  • Joelle Jones: Supergirl: Being Super #3 (interior art)
  • Julie Benson: Batgirl and the Birds of Prey #9 (co-writer)
  • K. Perkins: Superwoman #8 (writer)
  • Kamome Shirahama: Batgirl and the Birds of Prey #9 (variant cover)
  • Lilah Sturges: Everafter: From the Pages of Fables #8 (co-writer)
  • Marguerite Bennett: Batwoman #2 (co-writer), DC Comics Bombshells #25 (writer)
  • Marguerite Sauvage: Shade, the Changing Girl #7 (interior art, cover)
  • Mariko Tamaki: Supergirl: Being Super #3 (writer)
  • Msassyk: Gotham Academy: Second Semester #8 (interior art)
  • Nicola Scott: Red Hood and the Outlaws #9 (cover), The Flintstones #10 (variant cover)
  • Sandra Hope: Gotham Academy: Second Semester #8 (inker)
  • Shawna Benson: Batgirl and the Birds of Prey #9 (co-writer)
  • Tula Lotay: Everafter: From the Pages of Fables #8 (cover)
  • Yasmine Putri: The Hellblazer #9 (variant cover)

All together, there are 26 different female creators set to work on 24 different books, 2 more women than last month though 3 fewer books. DC’s now settled into their “Rebirth” lineup, and there’s not a huge amount of change from month to month, so most of the women above tend to have steady gigs, but the ranks don’t seem to be growing much. The numbers are stable, but below what DC has shown they’re capable of.

In terms of new names, Aneke is someone I don’t think we’ve seen at DC before; she’ll be drawing an issue of DC Comics Bombshells that brings back the universe’s Suicide Squad, so that should be a blast. K. Perkins is back too, though I don’t know if her writing gig on Superwoman is a onetime thing or she’ll be there moving forward. Finally, it’s very cool to welcome Lilah Sturges to the list! She’s been working on Everafter for a while now, but she’s recently transitioned to living openly as a woman and this is the first batch of solicits that reflects this change.

There aren’t any new series set to debut in April. As I said above, DC’s lineup is pretty set right now. We’ve got a new book or two since 2017 began, but not much else. I’m guessing they’ll be a new wave of “Rebirth” titles at some point soon, but for now things are pretty steady and uneventful.

Overall, April doesn’t look to be a bad month for women at DC, but it’s another average outing that doesn’t near their past highs. Nonetheless, it’s an impressive group of creators doing great work. The ranks are just leveled out right now. I wouldn’t expect much change until DC launches some new books or has a major creative overhaul.

Women in Comics Statistics: DC and Marvel, November 2016 in Review

January 31, 2017

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My latest “Gendercrunching” column went up at Bleeding Cool a week or so ago, and November 2016 saw DC posting a high percentage of female creators again as Marvel continued to slide.

DC had 19.4% female creators overall, a slight drop from October but still their second best total of the year. Marvel slipped down to 15.6% female creators, and while that wasn’t a big decline from October, it was the publisher’s third straight month of drops.

We also checked in on several smaller publishers. Boom! posted a whopping 40.9% female creators overall, the highest number we’ve ever seen from any publisher. Titan ticked down since our last visit but still came in at a very solid 22.1%. Dynamite fell more than half, posting only 9.1% female creators. Finally, Valiant ticked up slightly to 10.1%.

Head on over to Bleeding Cool for all of the stats and analysis!

Women at DC Comics Watch – March 2017 Solicits, 24 Women on 27 Books

January 12, 2017

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After closing out 2016 with some of their highest months ever, DC’s female representation has been coming in a bit lower in their solicits since then, and their March listings mark the lowest number of different female creators since August. It’s not a disastrous drop; the mid-20s is a fairly average range for DC these days, but it’s noticeably below where they were just a few months ago and a disappointing step back for a publisher whose numbers were trending upward. Let’s take a look at who’s doing what at DC in March 2017:

  • Afua Richardson: The Wild Storm #2 (variant cover)
  • Amanda Conner: Booster Gold/The Flintstones Annual #1 (co-writer), Harley Quinn #15 (co-writer, cover), Harley Quinn #16 (co-writer, cover), The Kamandi Challenge #3 (interior art, cover)
  • Becky Cloonan: Gotham Academy: Second Semester #7 (co-writer, cover), Shade, the Changing Girl #6 (cover)
  • Bilquis Evely: Wonder Woman #18 (cover, interior art)
  • Cecil Castellucci: Shade, the Changing Girl #6 (writer)
  • Eleanora Carlini: Green Arrow #18 (interior art), Green Arrow #19 (interior art)
  • Elena Casagrande: Vigilante: Southland #6 (interior art)
  • Emanuela Lupacchino: Green Lanterns #18 (variant cover), Green Lanterns #19 (variant cover), Supergirl #7 (cover), Superwoman #8 (interior art)
  • Gail Simone: Clean Room #17 (writer)
  • Hope Larson: Batgirl #9 (writer), Batgirl Annual #1 (writer)
  • Jenny Frison: Clean Room #17 (cover), Wonder Woman #18 (variant cover), Wonder Woman #19 (variant cover)
  • Jody Houser: Mother Panic #5 (writer)
  • Julie Benson: Batgirl and the Birds of Prey #8 (co-writer)
  • Kamome Shirahama: Batgirl and the Birds of Prey #8 (variant cover)
  • Laura Braga: DC Comics Bombshells #23 (interior art), DC Comics Bombshells #24 (interior art)
  • Marguerite Bennett: Batwoman #1 (co-writer), DC Comics Bombshells #23 (writer), DC Comics Bombshells #24 (writer)
  • Marguerite Sauvage: DC Comics Bombshells #23 (cover), The Fall and Rise of Captain Atom #3 (cover)
  • Marley Zarcone: Shade, the Changing Girl #6 (interior art, cover)
  • Mirka Andolfo: DC Comics Bombshells #23 (interior art)
  • Msassyk: Gotham Academy: Second Semester #7 (interior art)
  • Sandra Hope: Gotham Academy: Second Semester #7 (inker)
  • Shawna Benson: Batgirl and the Birds of Prey #8 (co-writer)
  • Tula Lotay: Everafter: From the Pages of Fables #7 (cover)
  • Yasmine Putri: Superwoman #8 (cover), The Hellblazer #8 (variant cover)

All together, there are 24 different women set to work on 27 different books at DC this March, 3 fewer women than last month though 6 more books. The increase in the number of books is an encouraging sign; while there are fewer women in the mix, the ones who are there are getting more work. Still, DC’s proven they’re capable of hiring 30+ female creators in a month and they currently aren’t doing so, and are thus failing to meet the standard that they set for themselves.

In terms of new names at DC, while I believe I’ve seen Eleanora Carlini’s name in the credits of Green Arrow lately, I think that she was a late addition and this might be the first time she’s in the solicits. She’ll be doing interior art there. We’ve also got a variant cover from Afua Richardson, who typically does work at Marvel. To the best of my knowledge, this is her first work at DC.

March looks to be a quiet month for new books. Batwoman #1 officially debuts after the “Rebirth” special last month, and I’m very much looking forward to that one. It’s got a great character and a stellar creative team, plus it’s spinning out of Detective Comics, which has been one of the highlights of the “Rebirth” line for me. The only other new book in the mix is a Vertigo series with a bunch of dudes in the mix, real and fictional.

Overall, the March numbers aren’t a terrible tumble by any means, but it’s the lowest that DC’s female representation has been in a while. These numbers always go up and down, of course, and this may just be a low ebb. DC’s capable of better regardless, and hopefully they’ll reach their potential and things will start to swing up again soon.

Women in Comics Statistics: DC and Marvel, October 2016 In Review

January 2, 2017

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My latest “Gendercrunching” article went up before Christmas over at Bleeding Cool, but I was busy with festive things and am only getting around to posting it here now. So let’s start off the New Year with some stats!

In October 2016, DC Comics posted one of their highest overall percentages of female creators yet, coming in at 19.7% overall. “Rebirth” has been good for women at DC thus far, and its run over the last five months has marked DC’s strongest period of female representation since this project began. Marvel slipped down to 16%, however, a drop that puts them mid-range relative to their past year. It’s been a couple of months of drops for Marvel now, and they’re noticeably off their previous highs.

We also began our biannual check-in on other direct market publishers. This month we visited Image, which ticked up slightly to 18.9%; IDW, which gained more than 4% female creators overall to land at 18.6%; and Dark Horse, which dropped down to land at 17.5%.

Head on over to Bleeding Cool for all of the stat fun!

Wonder Woman ’77 Meets The Bionic Woman #1 Review: A Team Up Forty Years in the Making!

December 7, 2016

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We’ve been seeing a lot of interesting crossovers at DC Comics lately, from Batman and the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles to Green Lantern and Star Trek. It’s always fun when two different publishers get together and do something cool and unique with their licensed properties.  And now we’ve got a great new team up between DC and Dynamite that brings together two of the most famous heroines of 1970s television, Wonder Woman and the Bionic Woman. Their solo TV series aired at the same time, but they never met on screen. Now they’re doing so in comic book form.

Wonder Woman ’77 Meets the Bionic Woman is penned by noted writer and famed Wonder Woman enthusiast Andy Mangels, with art from a great newcomer Judit Tondora. The six issue mini-series is set during the third season of each television show, and features the likenesses of both series’ stars, including Lynda Carter and Lindsay Wagner.

I’m pretty familiar with Carter’s Wonder Woman and her TV show, but the only things I know about Wagner’s Bionic Woman is that 1) it was a spinoff of The Six Million Dollar Man, which I also know very little about, 2) NBC did a reboot a few years back that wasn’t particularly good, and 3) Bill Haverchuck dressed up as Jaime Sommers on the Halloween episode of Freaks and Geeks. So I came in as half-knowledgeable and half-newbie. The knowledgeable part of me was glad to see so many characters and elements from the Wonder Woman television show in the mix; Mangels clearly knows his stuff, and has populated the book with a variety of enjoyable cameos and references. We’ve got Steve Trevor, of course, but also several less famous characters.

The newbie part of me recognized none of the many characters and things associated with The Bionic Woman, but googling various elements informed me that Mangels has created just as detailed a recreation of her world as he has with Wonder Woman’s, which will be very fun for fans of the program. Also, despite my complete lack of knowledge of half of the book, I still understood everything that was going on and my enjoyment of the book wasn’t at all impaired because I was out of The Bionic Woman loop. You don’t have to be a superfan of either to understand or enjoy this book. If you are, you may well have an even richer experience reading it, but it also works well if you’re coming in cold.

The story itself was classic team-up fare. Both woman’s respective spy agencies came together to stop a serious threat, Bionic Woman villain Ivan Karp and the paramilitary cabal known as CASTRA. The “cabal” bit was especially fun, because it promises more villains down the road, perhaps a combination of both the Wonder Woman and Bionic Woman rogues galleries. Diana Prince and Jaime Sommers were appointed as the protective detail for one of CASTRA’s targets, and a Wonder Woman and Bionic Woman team-up inevitably assumed.

What I really liked about this book was that both women were immediately on the same team, fighting bad guys together. They meet up even before their agencies officially liaise, and there’s mutual respect and acceptance straight away. Each recognizes that the other is a brave woman fighting on the right side of things, and they began to work together like it’s second nature. So many superhero team-ups these days start out with a misunderstanding and subsequent brawl, but Wonder Woman and the Bionic Woman are too smart for that. Instead, they just get to work being heroes.

This respect continues throughout the issue, including a scene where it seems that Jaime Sommers recognizes that Diana Prince is Wonder Woman. Diana brushes it off, and Jaime doesn’t press the issue. I’m guessing this will come up again as the series goes on, but for now Jaime trusts Diana enough to let her keep her secret. Plus there were more important things to deal with; you can’t be digging into secret identity shenanigans where there’s an evil cabal out there hatching fiendish plans!

DC’s Wonder Woman ’77 comic series has been hit and miss for me, artwise. Sometimes it’s spectacular, with spot on likenesses and gorgeous renderings of Wonder Woman and her 1970s world. Other times, it’s clunky and rough. Judit Tondora’s artwork here is definitely on the positive end of this spectrum. Her likenesses are solid, and she has a good handle on executing a variety of action packed scenes. The book lacks the detail that characterizes some of Wonder Woman ’77‘s best outings, but it’s a nicely drawn issue nonetheless, and the colors from Michael Bartolo and Stuart Chaifetz compliment Tondora’s linework well.

The book closes with a good cliffhanger ending, and there are a lot of interesting ways the series could go from here. I’m curious to see how Mangels and Tondora decide to roll with the Wonder Woman side of things; Wonder Woman ’77 has brought in several comic book villains who never appeared on the show, so it will be interesting to see if Wonder Woman ’77 Meets the Bionic Woman does the same or hews to the classic television ensemble. One scene in particular makes me think they may be going in the former direction, but I won’t give any spoilers here so suffice it to say, very vaguely, that someone made me think of someone not associated with the show. Time will tell. But for now, the team has put together a good first issue that’s worthy of the two icons it pairs up. The book is available in comic shops today, so check it out if you’re a fan of either of the television shows or of Wonder Woman in general.

Women at DC Comics – February 2017 Solicits, 27 Women on 21 Books

December 1, 2016

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DC’s female creator representation is set to remain steady albeit somewhat below their recent highs as the new year unfolds. The February 2017 solicits have some fun new books and the numbers are largely in line with the January solicits. DC’s posted higher numbers, but they’ve posted far, far lower too. Let’s take a look at who’s doing what at DC this February:

  • Amanda Conner: Harley Quinn #13 (co-writer, cover), Harley Quinn #14 (co-writer, cover)
  • Becky Cloonan: Gotham Academy: Second Semester #6 (writer, cover), Shade, the Changing Girl #5 (cover)
  • Bilquis Evely: Wonder Woman #16 (interior art, cover)
  • Cecil Castellucci: Shade, the Changing Girl #5 (writer)
  • Chynna Clugston Flores: Shade, the Changing Girl #5 (interior art)
  • Claire Roe: Batgirl and the Birds of Prey #7 (interior art)
  • Elena Casagrande: Vigilante: Southland #2 (interior art)
  • Emanuela Lupacchino: Green Lanterns #16 (variant cover), Green Lanterns #17 (variant cover)
  • Gail Simone: Clean Room #16 (writer)
  • Heather Nuhfer: Teen Titans Go! #20 (co-writer)
  • Hope Larson: Batgirl #8 (writer)
  • Jenny Frison: Clean Room #16 (cover), Shade, the Changing Girl #5 (variant cover), Wonder Woman #16 (variant cover), Wonder Woman #17 (variant cover)
  • Jody Houser: Mother Panic #4 (writer)
  • Joelle Jones: Supergirl: Being Super #2 (interior art, cover)
  • Julie Benson: Batgirl and the Birds of Prey #7 (co-writer)
  • Kamome Shirahama: Batgirl and the Birds of Prey #7 (variant cover)
  • Marguerite Bennett: Batwoman: Rebirth #1 (co-writer), DC Comics Bombshells #22 (writer)
  • Mariko Tamaki: Supergirl: Being Super #2 (writer)
  • Marley Zarcone: Shade, the Changing Girl #5 (interior art)
  • Mirka Andolfo: DC Comics Bombshells #22 (interior art)
  • Msassyk: Gotham Academy: Second Semester #6 (interior art)
  • Sandra Hope: Gotham Academy: Second Semester #6 (inker)
  • Sarah Vaughn: Deadman: Dark Mansion of Forbidden Love #3 (writer)
  • Shawna Benson: Batgirl and the Birds of Prey #7 (co-writer)
  • Stephanie Hans: Deadman: Dark Mansion of Forbidden Love #3 (cover)
  • Tula Lotay: All Star Batman #7 (interior art, cover, variant cover), Everafter: From the Pages of Fables #6 (cover), The Wild Storm #1 (variant cover)
  • Yasmine Putri: The Hellblazer #7 (variant cover)

All together, there are 27 different female creators set to work on 21 different books in February 2017, one more female creator than in January though 3 fewer books. Both months of 2017 have been in the high 20s, but DC’s solicits were in the low 30s at the end of 2016. It’s a light step down for the publisher, and the continuing unfolding of the second phase of “Rebirth” doesn’t seem to be growing the female creator ranks yet.

Part of the reason for the numbers not changing much is that there aren’t really any new women in the list above. It’s a lots of returning favourites and people we’ve seen recently; everyone’s a regular. There are folks in new gigs, however. Bilquis Evely is taking over as the artist on the even-numbered issues of Wonder Woman, and Marguerite Bennett is penning a Batwoman series.

Speaking of, there are a few new books with solid female character representation. Batwoman is the only female-led solo title set to debut; it premieres with a “Rebirth” issue this month, and then the regular series should launch in March. A couple of new team books have a lot of women in the mix as well, including The Wild Storm reboot, which name checks Angela Spica, Jenny Sparks, and Voodoo in the solicit, and the new Justice League of America, which counts Black Canary, Killer Frost, and Vixen as members.

Overall, is a fairly steady month for DC, with relatively decent female creator representation. The drop in the number of books is a bit disheartening; that’s the lowest number of titles since September. But the ranks as a whole are holding firm, and remain above where DC was when “Rebirth” began . DC’s previously shown that they’re capable of higher numbers, and perhaps the second wave of “Rebirth” will continue and help the publisher reach and perhaps surpass those totals.

Women In Comics Statistics: DC and Marvel, September 2016 In Review

November 28, 2016

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My latest “Gendercrunching” column is up at Bleeding Cool, and both DC and Marvel’s overall percentage remained in a fairly steady spot, though both ticked down slightly.

DC fell to 17% female creators overall, a tiny drop from August and well within the range they’ve been in for the past six months. Marvel was just a tick ahead of DC with 17.1% female creators, a small decline of 0.9% from the month before. Marvel’s a bit low compared to where they were recently, but well above their numbers from last autumn.

We also took a look at group editors at DC and Marvel, the senior editors who control specific sections of each publisher’s lineup. We broke up our stats by group editor and cut out the editorial numbers to focus solely on the creative side of things. The results were interesting: DC’s Brian Cunningham and Eddie Berganza were at the bottom of the list in the ballpark of about 3% female creators, while DC’s Mark Doyle and Jim Chadwick were at the top in the range of 20% female creators. All of Marvel’s group editors and a couple more from DC filled out the middle of the chart.

Head on over to Bleeding Cool for all of the numbers and analysis!


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