Posts Tagged ‘Investigating Lois Lane’

Come See Me At Hal-Con This Weekend, Table B1-3!

October 22, 2018

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It’s almost time for my local convention, Hal-Con, and I will be returning to the show this year, albeit with a slight caveat. I’m sharing Table B1-3 with my excellent writer pal Nicola R. White (she’ll have copies of her wonderful comic Wild Rose for sale!) but while the show runs from Friday to Sunday, I will only be at the show on Friday.

I’ve got another commitment that’s taken up the rest of my weekend, and I’m really sorry to be missing the show. But a) I’m very excited to be there on Friday, and b) Nicola will be at our table all weekend long with autographed copies of my books for sale. While you might not see me, you can get a copy of a book about your favourite superheroine at least.

Here’s some info for you! Hal-Con is at the new Halifax Convention Centre this year, which is very exciting. The vendor floor is open at these times:

 

  • Friday: 12:00PM – 7:00PM
  • Saturday: 10:00AM – 7:00PM
  • Sunday: 10:00AM – 6:00PM

 

And we’re on the fifth floor, with all of the vendors and autograph spots and such. Here is a handy map:

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I’ll have copies of Wonder Woman Unbound, Investigating Lois Lane, and The Many Lives of Catwoman for sale, along with free bookmarks for everyone who stops by. The books will be $20 each, or all three for $50, which is a pretty swell deal. Cash is great, but credit cards should be doable, depending on what the reception is like at the new place.

So yeah, come on by! If you’re at the show Friday, I look forward to seeing you. If you’re coming Saturday or Sunday, I’m sorry to miss you but be sure to stop by the table and scope out our wares. It should be a great show this year! It always is. Hal-Con does it right.

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Joye Murchison Kelly and Dorothy Roubicek Woolfolk to be Honoured with Bill Finger Award

June 14, 2018

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This is very, very cool. Two of the most important women in the early history of Wonder Woman are going to receive the Bill Finger Award at San Diego Comic-Con this summer. Joye Murchison Kelly was a ghost writer for William Moulton Marston in the early 1940s, while Dorothy Roubicek Woolfolk was an assistant editor on the original Wonder Woman comics and later returned to DC for a fascinating run editing Superman’s Girl Friend Lois Lane. Heidi MacDonald has a full report at The Beat, and you can read more on the official Comic-Con page.

The Bill Finger Awards honour comic book creators who have not received proper credit for their work and contributions to the industry. Bill Finger was famously screwed over by Bob Kane and DC. He did most of the work creating Batman, but Kane took all the credit. The awards were created by Finger’s friend Jerry Robinson in 2005, and 28 creators have won it since. Kelly and Woolfolk are the first women to do so.

I’ve written about both of these women in my books Wonder Woman Unbound and Investigating Lois Lane, and I’m absolutely delighted that they’re sharing this award. Both women are compelling and important figures in the history of the genre, and their work has been overlooked for decades.

In Kelly’s case, it’s because she was never credited. Marston hired her as a writing assistant in 1944, and she was soon writing full issues by herself as Marston’s health began to fail. Everything was still credited to “Charles Moulton,” Marston’s penname, in the comics, and Kelly’s contributions were long forgotten until DC’s Wonder Woman Archives line gave her due credit many decades later.

Kelly wrote several classic Wonder Woman stories featuring some of her most well known villains, including Dr. Psycho, the Cheetah, Dr. Poison, and more. She also continued Marston’s themes of female strength and power extremely faithfully, including Marston’s preoccupation with bondage imagery (it was a metaphor, but it had its limits). Perhaps most notably, Kelly coined Wonder Woman’s famous catchphrase “Suffering Sappho!” It had ancient Greek roots, of course, but was also a subtle nod to what the Amazons were actually getting up to on Paradise Island.

Woolfolk was an assistant editor on Kelly’s comics back when she was just Dorothy Roubicek. She worked for All-American publisher Max Gaines and was the first female editor at DC Comics, making sure that all the books came out on time. And when critics objected to Marston’s bondage fixation, Woolfolk was tasked with coming up with ways to tone things down. Marston didn’t listen to any of them, but it speaks to Gaines’ high opinion of her that she was his go-to gal on matters concerning his bestselling comic.

(Some sources suggest that Woolfolk wrote a few early Wonder Woman stories, but that doesn’t seem to be the case. She’s not credited as a writer in any of the Archives collections, which are painstakingly thorough).

Woolfolk worked for other publishers for a while, then married writer Bill Woolfolk and took a break from publishing when she had her kids. She returned to DC in the early 1970s as a full editor and revitalized the publisher’s romance line with fresh, relevant stories. Because of her success there, she was given control over Superman’s Girl Friend Lois Lane, and she brought the same modern, feminist sensibility to everyone’s favourite reporter. In her first issue, Lois dumped Superman and quit her job at the Daily Planet because she was sick of men telling her what to do. This feminist revolution was short-lived, though. The men in DC’s offices didn’t take kindly to having a woman around, and Woolfolk was unceremoniously ousted a few months later. You can read more about that in an excerpt from Investigating Lois Lane over at The Atlantic.

Both women are absolutely fascinating figures in comic book history, and this award is very much deserved. Kelly is 90 years old now, and will be in San Diego to accept the award. Woolfolk passed away in 2000, but her daughter will be there to accept the award on her behalf. This recognition is long overdue, but I’m so happy it’s here. Wonder Woman wouldn’t be the same without Kelly or Woolfolk, and I hope the award encourages fans and comic book historians alike to dig into their great work.

Come See Me at C2E2 in Chicago, Artist Alley Table E7, April 6-8th!

March 19, 2018

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Last week, I told you all about my upcoming “The Many Lives of Catwoman” panel discussion with Angelica Jade Bastién, Lauren Burke, Caitlin Rosberg, and Katie Schenkel at The Book Cellar in Chicago, IL, on April 5th at 7:00pm. That’s going to be all kinds of awesome. But it’s only part one of my upcoming Chicago fun! Starting the very next day, I will be at C2E2 all weekend long. Here is all the important info:

Tim Hanley @ C2E2

South Building at McCormick Place, Chicago, IL

April 6-8th

Artist Alley, Table E7

I have also built a handy map so that it’s easy to find me at the show. You can click to embiggen:

c2e2map

C2E2 is a great convention, and I’m so excited to be a part of it this year. I’ll be set up in Artist Alley for all three days, with all three of my books available for purchase. I’m talking Wonder Woman Unbound: The Curious History of the World’s Most Famous Heroine, my exploration of everyone’s new favourite cinematic heroine’s fascinating origins. Everybody loves Wonder Woman now, as they should. We’ve also got Investigating Lois Lane: The Turbulent History of the Daily Planet’s Ace Reporter, and it’s a perfect time to read up on Lois what with exciting new relaunches of Action Comics and Superman just around the corner. Heck, Brian Michael Bendis is gonna be at C2E2 too! And the third in the trilogy is The Many Lives of Catwoman: The Felonious History of a Feline Fatale, an overview of the many intriguing incarnations of this beloved character. Plus she’s getting married soon! Making this a good opportunity to read up on all of the romantic hijinks that led her to this point.

All three books will be available for sale, and I’ll have some fun free goodies to give away. And I’ll be glad to sign any and all of the books for free, of course, whether you’re buying them at the show or bringing your own copies from home. You can also just come by and chat superheroes for a while if you’d like. That’s always a good time.

So yeah, if you’re coming to C2E2 you should absolutely come by my table! And if you’re in the vicinity of Chicago and you aren’t coming to the show, you should probably remedy that. It’s a great convention, with a whole host of excellent guests and vendors and such. Susan Eisenberg, the iconic voice of Wonder Woman on the Justice League cartoon, is going to be there! That’s worth the price of admission alone. I hope to see you there!

Come See Me at Hal-Con This Weekend, September 22-24!

September 20, 2017

halcon

The biggest comics/sci-fi/general nerdery convention in my hometown is this weekend, September 22-24, and I am honoured to be a guest this year! Hal-Con is a great show held in downtown Halifax, and they’ve got a very cool lineup of guests, panels, and activities this year. The convention organizers always go all out to try to provide a cool experience for attendees, and they’ve done another excellent job this time around! I’m so excited to be a part of it.

So here’s where I’ll be this weekend:

My Table, A7: All Weekend Long!

I’ll be set up in the Scotiabank Centre for the entirety of the convention, at Table A7 in the guests area (between Gerhard and Ryan North, which is an A+ spot). Just look for my bright banner and the Wonder Woman table cloth! Here is a handy map:

halconmap

I’ll have copies of all three of my books for sale: Wonder Woman Unbound, Investigating Lois Lane, and The Many Lives of Catwoman, all for as reasonable a price as I can make them without losing money. And hopefully I’ll be set up for credit cards, if this new card reader thing I bought for my phone works, but cash is always good too. I’ll sign everything with my fancy book plates, of course. Plus, I’ll have free bookmarks to give away even if you don’t want to buy anything! The vendor area is open from 12-8pm on Friday, 9am-8pm on Saturday, and 9am-6pm on Sunday, and I’ll be at my table during those hours apart from events that follow.

Chat/Livestream at Extra Life HFX Booth: Gaming Floor, Friday 4pm

My pal Austin is part of this super cool gaming group that raises money for children’s hospitals, and I’ll be stopping by their booth to chat and be part of their livestream. Should be a good time! And maybe they’ll let me play video games. I wonder if they’ve got Mario Kart? Are folks even streaming Super Nintendo games? That may be too retro.

Panel, Getting Over Creative Hurdles: Room 302, Friday 4:45-5:30pm

Join me and novelist Margarita Gakis as we chat about what to do when you’ve written yourself into a corner or are otherwise stuck at any stage of a project. With Margarita doing fiction and me doing non-fiction, this should be a really fun chat with different perspectives and tips that are hopefully useful on both sides. We’ll be answering questions as well!

Panel, Women in Media: Room 301, Saturday 1-1:45pm

It’s me and Margarita Gakis again, talking about the role of women in media, how things have changed, and how far we have to go. Should be a cool conversation with lots to talk about! I’ll try not to blather on for too long about how amazing the Wonder Woman movie was, but I can’t guarantee I won’t.

Stargazer Soiree: Delta Halifax, Saturday 7-9pm

This is an event with all of the Hal-Con guests and staff and I’m guessing convention attendees as well? I’m not sure of the mechanisms through which convention attendees get in, but I’m pretty sure there is a way. Perhaps a Golden Ticket? I don’t know. Anyway, we’ll all be there are there’s drinks and snacks and such, so that’s fun.

Panel, Author Writing Tips: Room 302, Sunday 1:45-2:30pm

Join me, Margarita Gakis once more (I don’t know her at all, but by this point we should be fast friends! Or maybe mortal enemies? Time will tell. It should be an interesting dynamic either way), and Nicola R. White as we talk about writing, publishing, and general advice for getting involved in the world of books. There’ll be lots of audience questions for this too, which I’m looking forward to. I love Hal-Con’s commitment to these writing panels! So great.

So yeah, that’s my weekend. Should be busy but very fun. Come say hi, grab some books if you are so inclined, and check out the website for more great activities so that you can enjoy this wonderful show!

Investigating Lois Lane is a $2 Kindle Monthly Deal for September!

September 5, 2017

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Everybody loves a deal, and for the entire month of September, wow do I have a deal for you. My second book, Investigating Lois Lane: The Turbulent History of the Daily Planet’s Ace Reporter, is a Kindle Monthly Deal right now and you can get the ebook for a fraction of the usual cost. The book came out a year and a half ago, but if you missed it then, here’s your chance to check it out with some great savings:

The deal doesn’t appear to be global, but if you’re American or Canadian, you’re all set.

Investigating Lois Lane is an in depth look at the history of the character, and covers everything from her first appearance in 1938 to the present day. It also goes beyond comics to explore different incarnations of Lois in television, films, cartoons, and novels. The book is thorough but accessible, and offers a unique perspective on the world of superheroes. Lois has been a constant in the genre since it’s very inception, in all of its many forms, and tracing her history gives us a compelling vantage point to see the evolution of female characters in superhero stories over the past eight decades.

Lois is a fantastic heroine, and each era of the character is a blast in her own way. From her tenacious bravery in the 1940s to her feminist revolution in the 1970s to her status as the DC universe’s greatest journalist today, Lois is an icon of the comic book world. Outside of comics, Noel Neill, Phyllis Coates, Margot Kidder, Teri Hatcher, Dana Delany, Erica Durance, Kate Bosworth, and Amy Adams have all portrayed the character, and each brought something new and interesting to her. There’s so much to explore with Lois, and the book covers it all.

Needless to say, I had a wonderful time writing this book and while I’ve always loved Lois, digging into her past left me with an even greater appreciation for the character. I hope that you’ll check it out if you haven’t yet! For less than two bucks, you really can’t go wrong. And if you’d like a glimpse inside the book before you take the plunge, here’s an excerpt of one of my favourite chapters courtesy of The Atlantic. Get into all of the Lois Lane fun before the month is out to land this amazing deal!

Go Support “Sequential Crush Presents How to Go Steady” On Kickstarter!

June 27, 2016

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I don’t post about a lot of comic book Kickstarter projects here because there’s always a billion of them going on, many of which look fun or intriguing for one reason or another. But every so often there’s a project that I think everyone should get behind, and today that project is Sequential Crush Presents How to Go Steady by Jacque Nodell, with art by Jenny Cimino. The book is a how-to guide for love and dating based on romance comic books from the 1960s and 1970s, and it looks fantastic.

Romance comics are often overlooked by comic fans these days. When we think of the history of the medium, we often just focus on superheroes, or the brief crime/horror surge of the early 1950s, but romance comics were a big deal for a long time. They first debuted in the mid-1940s and became increasingly popular; by the 1960s, practically every comic book publisher had at least one romance book, if not several. It was a massively popular genre, and one of the very few corners of the comic book world marketed directly at female readers.

Reading old romance comics today is always entertaining because they were very much of their time, and often behind the times a bit since they tended to embody the values of the old white men who published them rather than the trendy young girls who read them. But they definitely did evolve as American society did, even resulting in some distinctly feminist tales by the 1970s. The genre offers a fascinating perspective on how young women were viewed in this era, as well as the dominant values of the period and how they changed.

Nothing better captured these dominant values than the advice columns that appeared in almost every romance comic series. Young girls would write in to ask advice on everything related to romance, from kissing to dating to fashion to jealousy to break ups, and the advice columnists would try to steer them in the proper direction. Jacque Nodell has pored over innumerable stories and advice columns to put together this book that explores the “timeless dating advice, wisdom, and lessons from vintage romance comics.”

And she’s certainly the best woman for the job! Her website, Sequential Crush, is arguably the best online resource for classic romance comics, a veritable treasure trove of old stories, advice columns, and quizzes, along with thoughtful and illuminating commentary on them all. In a landscape where the history of romance comics is too often ignored, Jacque Nodell has continually shone a light on the genre.

Jacque was actually a huge help in my own research, too. While putting together Investigating Lois Lane, I was stumped by a blatantly anti-feminist letter column that ran during Lois Lane’s women’s lib era when editor Dorothy Woolfolk revitalized her series; I couldn’t find information about it anywhere, and had no idea how to tackle it in the book. Then I found out about a similar column from a romance comic that was also edited by Woolfolk on Sequential Crush, and all the pieces fell into place. You’ll have to read my book to find out how, but my chapter on the subject owes a huge debt to Jacque!

Sequential Crush Presents How to Go Steady also features original art by Jenny Cimino which looks gorgeous; she’s totally capturing the classic romance comic vibe with her work here. The project as a whole should be a great, interesting read, and will be of particular interest to comic book fans, romance fans, and history buffs alike. You should definitely go take a look at it and considering backing the project; it’s almost a third of the way there now, and I’m very much hoping to see it make its funding goal and even more because this is definitely a book I want to have. Comics! History! Romance! What more could you want?

My Adventures in Chicago: The Lois Lane Panel at Women & Children First and C2E2

March 22, 2016

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Now that I am returned to my home and native land, I’ve got some time to look back at my Chicago trip and share some of the highlights. It was a fun, busy, Lois Lane-centric few days that started with the “Legacy of Lois Lane” panel Wednesday night at Women & Children First. Well, technically it started with me taking a bus from Kingston to Chicago, but that was less eventful; I listened to Hamilton and then slept a bunch. But then, awake and alert after all of that bus sleeping, I arrived in Chicago to panel it up!

The panel was a blast. Everyone at Women & Children First was fantastic and into the panel, and they couldn’t have been more helpful. Also, I lucked out and put together a ridiculously awesome group of panelists: Anne Elizabeth Moore moderated the panel and was spectacularly good at it, while Lauren Burke, Caitlin Rosberg, and Katie Schenkel were all smart and funny and made so many great points (in the photo above, from left to right it goes Anne, Katie, me, Lauren, Caitlin; also, we’re all wearing Daily Planet press badges). Plus Lauren brought some old issues of Superman’s Girl Friend Lois Lane, which was rad!

It’s hard to determine the success of a panel when you’re on it, but it felt like it went really well. We hit on most of the major topics we wanted to get into, and everyone got to be involved. They also had to bring in some more chairs and there were still people standing in the back, which was pretty great. Everyone seemed to be having a good time, and I know I had a lot of fun; you can’t really have a bad time when you’re talking about Lois Lane.  Plus I got to talk about some of my favourite Lois stories ever, chatted about Phyllis Coates for a bit, and we all worked in mentions of other great comics that are worth checking out. I love that everyone who attended the panel left with a list of a variety of killer comics to go find and read.

The panel was recorded, and I’ll post it once it goes online so everyone can see it!

After the panel came C2E2, which was also great! And enormous. Wow, I’ve never been to a show that big before. It was insane, in the best way.  It was hard not to buy everything; I had to talk myself out of purchasing the Batman v Superman Wonder Woman Barbie (it was AWESOME, but it was $60, which seemed a bit much). I did well with what I did purchase, though, including a great Sho Murase Catwoman print and a lucky pick on a Batman v Superman mini-Funko blind box that landed me a Wonder Woman! Plus I also got to see/meet a bunch of rad people including Marguerite Bennett (I can’t wait for her Lois in DC Comics Bombshells), Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez, Tommy Lee Edwards, and so many more!

But I wasn’t just there to take in the sights, even though I could have spent all weekend doing that and still not have seen everything! I was signing books at the Independent Publisher’s Group booth, and that was also a lot of fun. All of the IPG folks were great, and it was fun to see so many people come by! There were a few people I knew through the internet, but also folks who had seen the AV Club review or The Atlantic piece, so that was neat. I’m so glad that the press for Investigating Lois Lane seems to be reaching folks. So yeah, I got to sign a bunch of books and meet a bunch of people and I was surprised and pleased with the number of folks I saw this weekend given that I was only signing for two and a half hours.

In between all of the books events, I got to meet all of the people I’ve been working with in real life for the first time. My publisher is based in Chicago and my agent came over from Minnesota, so I got to hang out in person with all of the people I’ve been talking to through the internet for years and years. And they’re all wonderful! It was lovely to meet everyone for real and find out that they’re all as awesome as I thought they’d be. Everyone was so great and nice, plus they’re all very excited about Investigating Lois Lane and what might be coming next, so that was encouraging and fun. I’m really glad to be working with such good, smart people, and I’m very fortunate to be a part of such an amazing team. Also, extra huge thanks to my pal at Chicago Review Press, Mary Kravenas, for getting me through the busyness of everything!

So yeah, that was Chicago! It was a good trip all around. And I got to eat deep dish pizza, which was impressively tasty. I don’t know what they do to the cheese to make it chewy like bubblegum, but it is super weird and also super delicious. Huge thanks to everyone who came by the panel and the convention! It was great to see you all!


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