Posts Tagged ‘James Robinson’

Wonder Woman #35 Review: Please, Someone Make This Stop

November 22, 2017

ww35.jpg

Stop me if you’ve heard this before: In this issue of Wonder Woman, Diana appears only fleetingly and never speaks, and instead the book focuses on the backstory of a villain, the bulk of which we already knew. It sounds familiar because that’s what happened two issues ago with an outing that was all about Grail. Now we’ve got an issue that’s all about Diana’s brother, Jason. So basically, two of the last three issues of Wonder Woman have barely featured Wonder Woman at all. Yeah, that’s the ticket, DC. Wonder Woman’s never been more popular, so now’s a great time to sideline her in her own book in favour of subpar villains. Who thought this was a good idea? Who is letting this stupid story drone on? It’s mind bogglingly terrible. We’ll talk about it all in a moment, but first:

SPOILER ALERT… actually, never mind.

There is literally no new information in this book.

Jason monologued all of this stuff in the last issue.

It’s an utterly pointless, useless, boring regurgitation of a comic book.

Carry on.

Before we get to the comic book itself, let’s chat about the cover. Bryan Hitch’s covers for the arc thus far have been a bit bland, to be honest, but this one had me intrigued for a second. I feared that we would get what we got, an issue that was all Jason and no Diana, but the cover showed me otherwise. Teen Diana! Doing some rad Amazon training! That looks fun. Also, there’s Hippolyta with some bad, ancient Greek style bangs; that was less interesting. But teen Diana, that could be cool! Turns out, there is absolutely no teen Diana in this issue. There’s barely any adult Diana. So thanks for that cruel tease. If you haven’t got the book yet and, like me, are too much of a completist to drop Wonder Woman from your pull list even though it’s straight up garbage right now, I suggest you try to get the Justice League variant cover by Terry and Rachel Dodson. You can never go wrong with the Dodsons drawing Wonder Woman.

In terms of the inside of the issue, where to even start? Let’s go with something I’ve mentioned already, the fact that pretty much everything in this issue is information we already knew. Jason blathered on about his life two weeks ago, and nothing here adds to that. It’s even more blatant than the Grail issue from last month, which did basically the same thing but added a fight scene in the middle, at least. We got no real action in this issue, apart from the tease of an upcoming battle with some aquatic creatures because, god help us, this issue was only part one of this redundant exploration of Jason’s past. James Robinson must be laughing all the way to the bank, telling a story in one issue and then retelling that story again two weeks later. The dude is getting two comic books out of one story, and he’s done it twice now. That’s one way to manage the bi-weekly schedule, I suppose.

Another way is to churn out horrendous dialogue and then just leave it, I guess. Because there’s no way any degree of thought or effort was put into Glaucus’ narration of Jason’s tale. It is PAINFUL. So annoyingly folksy, with its countless dropped letters. It’s not his, it’s ‘is. It’s not and, it’s ‘n’. Every ing is an in’. An of is an o’. To is t’. It is so laboured and irksome and, most annoyingly, not even consistent. Robinson replaces the with th’, but only occasionally. Why? There is no rhyme or reason to it. It’s so bad. There are few things that are less enjoyable to read than a bad story poorly narrated. No one needs that double dose of unpleasantness. Then Glaucus just disappears for no good reason apart from some sort of bicentennial migration, because Robinson is putting as much effort into the plot as he is the dialogue.

The book’s one redeeming quality is the art, and even that is frustrating. Emanuela Lupacchino is an excellent penciller, and Ray McCarthy inks her well. And do you know what they’re particularly great at? Drawing Wonder Woman. And do you know what they’ve barely done at all in their last two issues of Wonder Woman? Drawn Wonder Woman. The few panels in which she appears are gorgeous, and they would do an amazing job on an issue that actually had Wonder Woman in it for any length of time. But no, DC’s chosen to waste this talent on some annoying boy that no one cares about. Meanwhile, the artists on the issues Wonder Woman actually does show up in are middling at best. Come on, now.

Finally, in the midst of this truly terrible outing, we’ve also got additional confirmation that Diana is still the daughter of Zeus in current continuity. This was a New 52 development, along with a horrible take on the Amazons, but the “Rebirth” arcs “The Lies” and “The Truth” reset that and erased those Amazons as a fiction crafted by the gods. Greg Rucka and company never addressed Diana’s birth directly, however, and it seems that it remains unchanged. The real Hippolyta also hooked up with Zeus, as this issue shows, and it looks like that’s just going to be the standard origin going forward. It was bound to stick after they used it in the movie and all, but it’s still dumb and antithetical to the very nature of the character.

Ultimately, this issue was very bad indeed and I would suggest buying literally any other comic book instead. There are lots of good ones. Hell, there are lots of bad ones that are still better than this foolishness. You can’t go wrong. Come back to Wonder Woman in four months. After Justice League‘s subpar box office performance, DC’s got to realize that Wonder Woman is their biggest character right now and they’ll put a great team on the book then. Right? I hope so, because what they’re churning out now is just embarrassing.

Advertisements

Wonder Woman #34 Review: The Worst Family Reunion, On Multiple Levels

November 8, 2017

ww34

Although this is the 34th issue of the current incarnation of Wonder Woman, it’s also something more: When you add up all of the issues from past volumes together, this is actually the 700th issue of Wonder Woman! It’s a massive achievement. Apart from a few short breaks here and there, Wonder Woman has been published continuously since 1942, one of only a handful of titles with such a legacy. It’s fun to think back to all of the different versions of Wonder Woman we’ve seen in the series over the years, how she’s evolved and grown, overcome various setbacks, and continued to be an inspirational heroine for so many. While Wonder Woman’s status as a cultural icon often supersedes the ups and downs of her comic book adventures, those stories showcase one of the most fascinating and compelling journeys in the history of the medium. Hitting 700 issues is remarkable, and I’m glad that DC noticed the numbers and marked the occasion.

It’s too bad that the story inside is absolutely terrible. We’ll dig into it all, but first:

SPOILER ALERT!!

I am about to reveal the foolish twists and turns inside this issue!

Look away if you haven’t read it yet!

Or really, just read this instead! The issue is awful!

I’m going to start with something really nitpicky, because for some reason I just can’t stand bad versions of Wonder Woman’s tiara. Sergio Davila penciled this issue, and we saw him a couple issues back in Wonder Woman #32. His art wasn’t great then, but it was serviceable and he had the tiara about right. We’ve got a few versions of the tiara going across DC’s line right now so there’s really not a definitive take on it currently, and Davila was in the ballpark of these various designs. Then, in this issue, it got wonky. The red star seemed to get smaller as the issue progressed, while the tiara itself grew wider and bulkier. It just looked wrong. And I know it’s a small thing, but when the writing is so bad, you look to the art for a little bit of spark. Unfortunately, in this issue the art just annoyed me further.

Not as much as the writing, though. Good lord. I mean, DC Comics is a professional comic book company. They’ve been publishing a comic called Wonder Woman for 75 years and 700 issues now! You would think they’d all know how to put together an enjoyable issue by now. But no. This arc has been absolutely painful thus far, and it’s not any better here. Diana’s reunion with her brother Jason was beyond corny. So sappy and over the top and just cringeworthy most of the time. Their conversation took up the bulk of the book, and while it was nice to actually have Wonder Woman show up in Wonder Woman for a change, their mutual fawning and getting to know each other was not pleasant.

And then we got a shocking turn of events. All of those insipid, boring pages we just sat through? They were a fake out! Jason is secretly evil, hates Wonder Woman, and has been working with Grail the whole time! Then Grail showed up and there was a big old fight and oh dear, a startling cliffhanger with Wonder Woman in a real bind. IT. WAS. SO. STUPID.

Here’s the thing: If you’re going to dedicate half an issue to setting up a twist that then invalidates everything that came before, make those pages good. Make them interesting or fun or compelling in some way so that the reader gets emotionally invested. Sell me on this burgeoning sister/brother relationship! Give them an engaging dynamic, a connection that has me rooting for them and glad to have him be a part of a book! Whatever you do, don’t make these pages absurdly boring, because when you do that and your new good guy turns out to be a bad guy the only reaction you’re going to get is, “Well, that’s the first interesting thing he’s ever done.”

When the turn came, part of me was very much underwhelmed, but the other part of me was just glad that Diana’s bland, dull twit of a brother wasn’t going to be hanging around being a bore for the next few months. He’ll still be boring, I suppose. Being evil doesn’t make him any more interesting. But at least we don’t have to sit through another droning, hackneyed heart to heart conversation.

Anyway, this arc continues to be generally horrible. And the teaser at the end of the issue promised that the next outing is “The Story of Jason,” so please keep me in your thoughts and prayers as I prepare for this time of trial and tribulation. If I have to sit through another issue of Wonder Woman without Wonder Woman dedicated to the tedious backstory of some dumb ass side character I couldn’t possibly care less about, I’m going to lose my mind. Also, I know Jason’s backstory already. He blathered on about it in this issue, and while I’m sure some of it was lies, I’m guessing that the bulk of it is the same plus a couple of dark twists and some whiny brooding over his famous sister. And I don’t want to read 20 pages of that. Ugh.

Wonder Woman #33 Review: Just… What Are They Even Doing Here?

October 25, 2017

ww33

You may recall that when this new arc began a month ago, I wasn’t terribly pleased with the fact that Wonder Woman appeared in only a few pages of the first issue. The book is called Wonder Woman, after all. I don’t think it’s unreasonable to expect a decent amount of the titular heroine in it. Well, the latest issue has no Wonder Woman at all, except for a few shots in which she appears on a television screen in the background. Instead, the book is all about Grail and how she’s killing gods to help regrow Darkseid. It is, essentially, a pointless comic book. It’s Wonder Woman without Wonder Woman, and it’s an issue that gives us backstory that’s already been well established in the first two issues of this run. Also, the writing still absolutely sucks. So yeah, let’s talk about it all, but first:

SPOILER ALERT!!

Though really, nothing important happens!

It’s all stuff we already knew was going on!

I don’t know why this issue exists, to be honest!

But still, look away if you don’t want to be further spoiled!

So, Grail is killing gods to feed Darkseid to help him grow from a baby into an adult. These are things we knew already, and yet for some reason this entire issue is dedicated to further explaining this. Plus there’s a fight with Perseus, and then another fight with an A.R.G.U.S. team, and finally they end up planning to go after Jason, Diana’s brother. That’s all this issue is. Twenty pages of previously established plot points and a couple of brawls. I mean, look, this story as a whole isn’t even good to begin with. Reader enthusiasm is LOW. And then you dedicate the third issue to basically rehashing stuff we learned a month ago in the first issue? That’s no way to tell a story. Twelve issues of this nonsense is going to be an ordeal.

The writing continues to be quite poor. It’s formulaic and dull, though mercifully it’s not as over-written as the first two outings. It was all quite bad, but at least it was over quick. The art was solid throughout, though. I quite like Emanuela Lupacchino’s work, and as much as I was not looking forward to this arc, I was a little bit excited to see her drawing Wonder Woman. She and inker Ray McCarthy are a great team, and with Romulo Fajardo Jr. coloring, it was guaranteed to look good. But, of course, I got no Wonder Woman. Only Grail. And while it was fine, visually, it all felt like a huge waste of Lupacchino’s talents. Put her on an issue that matters, one where she actually gets to draw Wonder Woman.

Honestly, I have nothing else to say about this issue other than it’s not good and I did not particularly care for any of it, nor for any of this arc thus far.

So let’s talk about something else. Since Wonder Woman sucks right now, we fans aren’t getting our usual bi-monthly dose of Amazonian entertainment. Luckily, I’m here to help with some suggestions for other books you can read instead. First off, I heartily recommend Bombshells United, which just started in September. It’s a follow up to DC Comics Bombshells after its stellar run ended this summer, and it’s got the same creative team presenting a retelling of World War Two in which DC’s female superheroes take center stage. The current arc is focused on Wonder Woman dealing with Japanese internment camps in America, and it’s got a Wonder-centric supporting casting featured re-imagined versions of a couple of Wonder Girls. It’s such a good book, with a great take on Wonder Woman.

Also, there’s a DC lady team-up going on right now in Batgirl and the Birds of Prey, and Wonder Woman is in the mix there too, along with Batwoman, Catwoman, Spoiler, and more. I’m not up to date with the series, but I’ve been hearing good things about this arc and it’s rad to have so many heroines all together. And if you’re looking for heroine fun beyond Wonder Woman herself, Batgirl‘s been an enjoyable read since the “Rebirth” relaunch last summer, and the new Batwoman series has been excellent at well. There’s a few good books over at Marvel, too: Ms. Marvel is perennially amazing and if you haven’t been reading that you’ve been doing yourself a disservice, the new Hawkeye series stars Kate Bishop and it’s a dang delight, and Jane Foster’s adventures as Thor in Mighty Thor have been action-packed but also quite moving. There are lots of great comics with superheroic female leads out there, so check out a few of those if Wonder Woman isn’t giving you the fun you’re looking for right now.

Anyway, it looks like we’ll be back to Diana and Jason in two weeks time, and Wonder Woman will actually be in her own book again. Hooray, but also, it’s probably not going to be much better. We’re a quarter of the way through this arc, and it’s been uniformly terrible thus far. Things may pick up, I suppose. You never know what might happen. But based on everything we’ve seen up to this point, we’re just going to have to wait this story out and hope that DC picks a better team with a better angle to take over in a few months.

Wonder Woman #32 Review: Children of the Gods Continues, Unfortunately

October 11, 2017

ww32.jpg

Let’s start this review with a question: How many female characters other than Wonder Woman have speaking parts in this issue? During the initial “Rebirth” arcs, there were a wide variety of women in the mix, from allies like Etta Candy and Barbara Minerva to villains like Dr. Cyber and Veronica Cale. Plus Amazons. A whole lot of Amazons. Wonder Woman‘s last arc, “Heart of the Amazon,” was essentially a Diana/Etta team up story, and it featured an array of women in all sorts of different roles, good and bad, primary and incidental. There was even an entire team of female assassins, with several deep cut characters from DC’s history. So now with “Children of the Gods,” the story that’s introducing Diana’s brother to the world for whatever reason, how many women other than the title character are involved? For this issue, one. One woman in the entire book. Her role takes up about half a page, and she directs Diana to her brother. That is all, and I think that speaks volumes about this arc and it’s creative team. We’ll get into the issue as a whole, but first:

SPOILER ALERT!!

I am about to discuss all of the dumb things that happened in this issue!

Look away if you haven’t read it yet!

So the lack of female characters is disheartening, especially since the book spent the last year and a bit building such a stellar cast of women around Wonder Woman. On top of that, it’s just not a very good comic book, on any level. The story is clunky, the writing is poor, the art is middling. It’s not an enjoyable read, and it’s so awkward that it’s hard to feel any connection to the story. Even the big emotional climax at the end of the issue when Diana sees her brother for the first time falls absolutely flat because it’s so painfully clichéd; they immediately recognize each other because they’re twins and feel their connection, and I rolled my eyes so hard that I may need to go see an optometrist.

James Robinson’s writing is unremarkable throughout the book. For example, there’s two pages of Diana and Hercules’ lawyer driving to his home to read his will that are an enormous waste of space, as well as a battle with parademons that reads like it was tacked on to add a bit of action to this otherwise lifeless issue. The whole thing felt like filler, as if Robinson knew he wanted to end this issue with the reveal of Jason and just threw a bunch of things together to fill up the nineteen pages before that. We get slightly more information on the dead gods, I suppose, but it’s nothing that we didn’t already know from Grail in the last issue.

The art didn’t help matters, either. Sergio Davila’s pencils, with inks from Scott Hanna and Mark Morales, were generic superhero fodder. I didn’t find much in the way of a unique style or artistic flair. It was standard cape comic art, and not particularly strong art at that. It wasn’t terrible by any means, but there was nothing interesting about it. It was serviceable at best. Though I did like how Davila drew Diana’s hair later in the issue in a sort of up-do thing with her tiara perched higher up. That was kind of a cool look. I’m always down for a creative use of the tiara.

There were also two story choices that rubbed me the wrong way as a Wonder Woman fan. First was the depiction of Hercules. Back in the 1940s, Hercules was a villain. His betrayal and imprisonment of the Amazons is what led Hippolyta to leave the world of men and take her warriors to Paradise Island to live in an all-female utopia. For William Moulton Marston, Hercules represented the worst of men’s aggression and dominance, and most incarnations of the character have followed suit. We don’t know what, if any, role Hercules played in this modern version of the Amazons; all of the New 52 stuff is up in the air after “The Lies” and “The Truth,” and our knowledge of the true Amazons is limited. But introducing Hercules as a dude who’s done some good stuff and some bad stuff, and who admired Diana, largely ignores what he’s represented in past incarnations of Wonder Woman. I don’t hate that he’s sorry for his past mistakes, since it’s always good to show how people can change. It’s more that Hercules carries a lot of baggage in terms of the history of the Amazons, and his depiction in this arc doesn’t acknowledge this in the least. He’s kind of a loaded character, and they’ve ignored that entirely.

Second, this issue introduces the Oddfellows, Steve’s tactical team that is comprised of modern versions of his associated from the Wonder Woman movie. We’ve got Sameer, Charlie, and Chief, all written much like their film counterparts, just jumped ahead a century and given some heavier artillery. This annoyed me, in part because this arc has been so bad thus far that I hate to see these characters that I quite enjoyed on the big screen put to such poor use here. I also found it very telling that the creative team borrowed a bunch of the fellows from the Wonder Woman film, and yet Etta Candy has been absent from both issues of this new arc. I mean, come on now.

So, I did not particularly care for this issue, and I am not enjoying the specter of five more months of this that lies ahead. It all feels fundamentally flawed across the board, like the creative team and the editors just don’t understand what a Wonder Woman comic should be. We’re only two in, of course, and it may well pick up eventually. But thus far, this arc has done nothing but confirm all of my worst fears from when the storyline was first announced.

Wonder Woman #31 Review: It’s Going To Be A Long Six Months

September 27, 2017

ww31.jpg

I just don’t understand why this is happening, gang. DC finally has Wonder Woman back on track after the New 52 reboot took her increasingly off course for five years, and her popularity is sky high following the massive success of the movie this summer. Greg Rucka, Bilquis Evely, Nicola Scott, and Liam Sharp re-established her beautifully with the first year of “Rebirth” and then Shea Fontana, Mirka Andolfo, David Messina, and Inaki Miranda made the most of the new status quo with their excellent, compelling “Heart of the Amazon” arc. And now we’ve got a story about Diana’s brother, tied to a pre-“Rebirth” event no one particularly cared about, with several elements that are technically no longer part of Wonder Woman’s continuity. It is the opposite of accessible, and it’s also the opposite of what anyone who’s loved the first thirty issues of the new Wonder Woman and/or the movie is looking for. I’m utterly flabbergasted that DC is dedicating six months and twelve whole issues to this story that next to no one is clamouring for.

Plus, most damningly, it’s just not good. This first issue is rough in a lot of ways, but here’s the big thing you need to know about it: It’s an issue of Wonder Woman in which Wonder Woman only appears on six pages. If Wonder Woman isn’t the star of your Wonder Woman, you’ve done screwed up. I was really hoping that, as much as I didn’t love the idea of this arc, it would turn out to be surprisingly good and interesting, but this first issue has squashed that hope considerably. It’s bad and dumb and seems destined to try my patience. Let’s dig into it all, but first:

SPOILER ALERT!!

It’s a first issue so I won’t be too spoilery moving forward!

However, a couple of plot points will be discussed!

Continue to read at your own discretion!

So let’s start with the elephant in the room that is James Robinson. Once a legend in the business because of Starman, his fame has dimmed in recent years after some gruesome and grotesque superhero outings and his transphobic indie book. His work over the past few years seems generally at odds with the message and tone of Wonder Woman, especially in her re-established “Rebirth” form. Furthermore, after Rucka’s fine work on the book, a lot of folks, myself included, were hoping that the writing reins would get passed on to one of the many amazing female writers working in the business today. Robinson taking over the book for an extended run is an all around bizarre choice by DC.

And one that has resulted in a very bad first issue. There’s the fact that Wonder Woman is barely in it, of course, but more than that it’s a clumsy, awkwardly expository outing. The book takes twelve pages to set up the villain, with more than half of the story dedicated to a character who’s quickly taken off the board. I don’t want to get too into the details for folks who haven’t read it, but essentially Grail is taking the power of gods to repower Darkseid, and a huge portion of the book is dedicated to setting that up. The execution of this both sidelines Wonder Woman and drags on with shrug-inducing reveals and painful dialogue.

The dialogue especially is a constant problem throughout the issue. Not only are characters over explaining everything, but there’s no natural flow to any of it. It’s stilted and drawn out, laden with rough transitions, and it all combines to take the reader out of the story again and again. It’s so clunky that I kept thinking, “Nobody talks like this. Why is this so awkward?” and it makes for an unpleasant read.

The art, however, was quite strong throughout. Penciller Carlo Pagulayan and his inkers Sean Parsons, Jason Paz, and Scott Hanna do a nice job with every aspect of the book, bringing some life to the weak script and saving the issue from being a complete disaster. Wonder Woman’s fight with Giganta is particularly well done, and they’ve got an excellent handle on Wonder Woman herself. I can see some of Nicola Scott’s take on the character, with a little bit of Gal Gadot mixed in too, all rendered in Pagulayan’s own style to add up to quite a good Wonder Woman. Their action scenes are enjoyable as well, and quite compelling if you ignore the dialogue and just focus on the visual storytelling. I’m curious to see more from them, and have my fingers crossed that they’ll end up with fun things to draw as the story progresses. Also, shout out to Romulo Fajardo Jr.! He’s back again colouring the book, and doing an amazing job as always. The man has an uncanny ability to pair seamlessly with any artist he works with in a complimentary way that elevates the art even higher, and he’s at it again with this issue. I’m so glad to see he’s sticking with the book.

So we’ve got good art and terrible writing, but the scales tip decidedly to the negative all together when we consider the ridiculous premise. The primary antagonist Grail is a product of the New 52 Amazons who have since been revealed as a fabrication by the gods, so basically she should not exist. But because of her prominent role in “The Darkseid War” event and the fact that she’s Darkseid’s daughter, she somehow carries on to plague Wonder Woman. And Wonder Woman’s brother, which is also a thing that is happening. He was teased in the “Rebirth” special, but seemingly forgotten for the next 15 months and never mentioned at all in the new Wonder Woman as much better stories were told instead. But here we are, picking up on some very dumb loose threads and tying it all together. At a time when everyone is in love with Patty Jenkins’ Wonder Woman and wants more Diana, more Amazons, more bad ass female characters generally, and more women in charge of these feminist icons, the comic’s got a male writer telling a story centered on Wonder Woman’s brother. And, if the first issue is any indication, a really bad story at that. I have no idea why DC is doing this. All I know is that it looks like it’s going to be a very long six month for Wonder Woman enthusiasts.

New Wonder Woman Arc to Focus on her Brother OR No One Wants This

June 20, 2017

ww31

DC Comics announced a new creative team for their Wonder Woman comic yesterday, with James Robinson coming on board to write the book alongside Carlos Pagulayan and Emanuela Lupacchino on art. They’re going to do a six-issue arc that will run bi-monthly from September through December, and it will pick up on threads first introduced in DC’s “Rebirth” special a year ago. The solicit for the first issue says:

Who is Wonder Woman’s brother? Taken away from Themyscira in the dead of night, the mysterious Jason has been hidden somewhere far from the sight of gods and men…but his life and Wonder Woman’s are about to intersect in a terrifying way, bringing them face to face with a cosmic threat they never imagined!

I am underwhelmed, to say the least. Wonder Woman has been stellar since its “Rebirth” relaunch, with Greg Rucka, Bilquis Evely, Nicola Scott, and Liam Sharp revitalizing the character and setting her on a good path after several rough years following the book’s previous relaunch in 2011. Shea Fontana and Mirka Andolfo are set to take over the book in July for five issues, and that sounds like it’s going to be a fun run. I was pleased to see a female writer take over the series, and Mirka Andolfo’s art is always a treat. But now we’ve got a male writer at the helm again (and one with a problematic writing record at that). We do have Emanuela Lupacchino on art, and she’s marvelous, but the solicit is all about “legendary writer James Robinson,” along with credits over a decade old, and doesn’t mention the art at all. Robinson is also focusing on Wonder Woman’s mysterious brother, a bizarre turn that shows DC seems to have learned nothing from the success of the Wonder Woman movie.

First, with so many amazing female writers working in comics right now, DC should be handing over the reins of Wonder Woman to one of them long term. The book has had some great male writers over the years, and Rucka’s tenure over the past year was fantastic, but it’s time for a new perspective on the book. Men have written Wonder Woman for the vast majority of her seventy-six year history. Meanwhile, giving the Wonder Woman film to Patty Jenkins gave Warner Bros. its first critically acclaimed superhero film in years because she brought something new to the table. DC should do the same with the book and bring in one of the many amazing women working in comics right now.

Second, a brother? Has DC not seen any of the responses from folks coming out of the Wonder Woman movie? No one left the theater thinking that there needed to be more men in the mix. They wanted more Diana, more Amazons, more Etta, more of all of the amazing women that made up the film. Introducing Diana’s brother is the last thing anyone wants right now. Long term fans of the comic have been loving the female-centric storyline of the “Rebirth” era thus far, while potential new fans curious about the character after the movie are going to have no interest whatsoever in some new dude.

The brother angle was a weird idea from the start. When the “Rebirth” special came out a year ago, the tease struck me as a fundamentally dumb move. Diana is a unique creation, the only child of the Amazons. To introduce a sibling is unnecessary enough (unless they brought back Nubia, which could be cool if done right), but to make it a male sibling just totally misses the point of having Amazons in your universe. They let you tell cool stories about women! DC doesn’t need to stick a man in there; they can do fun things with the amazing women that they already have.

The people inside DC Comics can be dopes sometimes. Wonder Woman has never been more popular. The movie is a smash hit! And they’re putting out a comic book that’s going to appeal to few if any of her fans, new or old. It reminds me of 1973, when DC returned Wonder Woman to her Amazon roots after she appeared on the first cover of Ms. Magazine and became a mascot of the women’s lib movement. Just like today, Wonder Woman was hugely famous outside of the comics, but DC handed the book to Robert Kanigher, an old white guy who ignored her new status and wrote a bunch of lazy, subpar issues that failed to capitalize on her popularity. Four decades later, DC is making the same mistakes.

Part of me is hoping that this is some ill-considered cleanup operation, that editorial is thinking, “Let’s deal with this seed we planted a year ago and then get on to a cool, different creative team in the New Year.” Maybe they’re just burning off three months of comics to follow up on this story that absolutely no one is clamoring for and they’ve got a great team lined up after that. That would be a dumb plan; better to just let the seed die. But at least it would be a plan with something better in the future. As is, this is just dumb and ill-timed, as well as a big missed opportunity to make the most of a huge moment for Wonder Woman. Even if this somehow turns out to be a decent story, which seems very unlikely but you never know, it’s just the wrong direction for the book right now. Put women in charge of Wonder Woman with women on the pages, please.

The Last Amazon In Earth 2 #8 Is Actually…

January 9, 2013

earth28

First, the bad news.  The Amazons are still mostly dead everywhere.  In the regular DC universe, Hera turned Hippolyta into a statue and the rest of the Amazons into snakes.  Only Wonder Woman is still around.  Over in Earth 2, the hordes of Apokalips wiped out all of the Amazons, INCLUDING Wonder Woman, but it seems that they missed one.  She was revealed in today’s Earth 2 #8 by James Robinson and Yilidray Cinar.  She is…

SPOILERS!!

(Though not really huge spoilers.  It’s Earth 2.  They’ve done this before.  You could have figured this out in 3 seconds with a quick google when they announced that an Amazon was still alive.)

fury

Wonder Woman’s daughter, Fury!!  And that’s all we know so far.  The original Fury was Hippolyta Trevor, the daughter of the Golden Age Wonder Woman and Steve Trevor.  She’s named after the mythological Furies, not because she’s angry.

This Fury looks pretty angry, though.  You probably would too, if the hordes of Apokalips had wiped out your whole family.  We know that she’s Wonder Woman’s daughter, but not who her father is or her given name or any other details.  I suspect that’ll be revealed soon enough.  We also know that she hangs out with Steppenwolf, that big guy on the cover at the top.  Maybe she’s really into Hermann Hesse.

So hooray!!  The population of Amazons in DC comics has doubled.  I mean, sure, we had hundreds of Amazons before the relaunch, just in one universe, but two Amazons across two universes is great too.  They probably just don’t want to overwhelm us with two many Amazons.  It’s thoughtful of them, really.


%d bloggers like this: