Posts Tagged ‘Rachel Dodson’

Women & NB Creators at DC Comics, November 2019 Solicits: 25 Creators on 25 Books

September 24, 2019

womenatdcNOV

November has DC back on a regular four-week schedule, but the publisher’s output remains high and we’re seeing the numbers for female and non-binary creators continuing to hold steady. Hopefully this marks a change for DC, who have been unimpressive with representation throughout the year. Let’s take a look at who’s doing what this November:

  • Adriana Melo: Harley Quinn & Poison Ivy #3 (interior art)
  • Amanda Conner: Wonder Woman: Come Back To Me #5 (co-writer, cover)
  • Becky Cloonan: Doom Patrol: Weight of the Worlds #5 (co-writer, interior art, cover)
  • Bilquis Evely: The Dreaming #15 (interior art)
  • Cecil Castellucci: Batgirl #41 (writer)
  • Emanuela Lupacchino: Batman/Superman #4 (variant cover), Birds of Prey #2 (interior art, cover)
  • Jenny Frison: Wonder Woman #82 (variant cover), Wonder Woman #83 (variant cover)
  • Jessica Dalva: The Dollhouse Family #1 (cover)
  • Jody Houser: Harley Quinn & Poison Ivy #3 (writer)
  • Joelle Jones: Catwoman #17 (writer, interior art)
  • Kami Garcia: Joker/Harley Quinn: Criminal Sanity #2 (writer)
  • Kamome Shirahama: The Flash #82 (variant cover)
  • Kat Howard: Books of Magic #14 (co-writer)
  • Kelly Sue DeConnick: Aquaman #54 (writer)
  • Laura Braga: Supergirl Annual #2 (interior art)
  • Marguerite Bennett: RWBY #2 (writer)
  • Michelle Delecki: Aquaman #54 (variant cover), Inferior Five #3 (interior art), Metal Men #3 (interior art)
  • Mirka Andolfo: Lois Lane #5 (variant cover), RWBY #2 (interior art)
  • N.K. Jemison: Far Sector #1 (writer)
  • Nalo Hopkinson: House of Whispers #15 (co-writer)
  • Rachel Dodson: Batgirl #41 (variant cover)
  • Reiko Murakami: Basketful of Heads #2 (cover)
  • Sandra Hope: Superman: Up In The Sky #5 (interior art)
  • Sarah Stone: RWBY #2 (cover)
  • Tiffany Turrill: Lucifer #14 (cover)

All together, we’ve got 25 different female creators set to work on 25 different books in November, two fewer creators and books than in October. As best as I can tell, there are no non-binary creators in this round of solicits. While there are double drops, the number of books overall has dropped as well, and we’ve ended up at a similar level.

Or rather, exactly the same. With female creators on 25 of 75 books in November, that gives us representation across 33% of the line. That’s the same total as in October, despite all the shifting in output. DC putting our more books again has been a boon for female creators.

It’s not a busy month for new creators, but there are some notable additions. Jessica Dalva is doing the cover for The Dollhouse Family, a new book that’s part of Joe Hill’s horror imprint that’s been rolling out slowing thus far this fall. We’ve also got acclaimed author N.K. Jemison writing Far Sector, a new Green Lantern series that’s part of DC’s Black Label, and I am beyond excited to dig into that!

Far Sector is the only new title with a female lead. November is pretty quiet at DC, though there is another round of those unspecified annuals. I don’t know why DC isn’t listing creators for those, and I imagine that their not doing so is annoying retailers quite a bit.

Overall, DC is holding steady in terms of female creator representation now that they’re putting out more books. As always with the Big Two, time will tell if this is an actual shift or a momentary blip, but it’s good to see at least one month of consistency from them at a relatively decent level.

Women & NB Creators at DC Comics Watch, August 2019 Solicits: 15 Creators on 16 Books

July 22, 2019

womenatdcAUG.png

DC’s numbers for female and non-binary creators haven’t been high for a while, in part because they’ve trimmed back their line and fewer books means fewer creators across the board. But still, even in this new reality, DC’s representation for August is a step down from what we’ve been seeing lately. While the publisher’s Zoom and Ink lines (soon to be renamed) are much more diverse right now, the single issue line remains behind the times. Let’s dig into the solicits and see who’s doing what at DC in August:

  • Amanda Conner: Wonder Woman: Come Back To Me #2 (co-writer, cover)
  • Bilquis Evely: The Dreaming #12 (interior art)
  • Cecil Castellucci: Batgirl #38 (writer)
  • Elena Casagrande: Young Justice #8 (interior art)
  • G. Willow Wilson: Wonder Woman #76 (writer), Wonder Woman #77 (writer)
  • Jenny Frison: Wonder Woman #76 (variant cover), Wonder Woman #77 (variant cover)
  • Joelle Jones: Catwoman #14 (cover)
  • Kat Howard: Books of Magic #11 (writer)
  • Kelly Sue DeConnick: Aquaman #51 (writer)
  • Mirka Andolfo: Catwoman #14 (interior art)
  • Nalo Hopkinson: House of Whispers #12 (co-writer)
  • Rachel Dodson: Justice League #29 (variant cover)
  • Sandra Hope: Superman: Up in the Sky #2 (inker)
  • Tiffany Turrill: Lucifer #11 (cover)
  • Yasmine Putri: Lois Lane #2 (variant cover), The Flash #76 (variant cover), The Flash #77 (variant cover)

That is not a long list. Altogether, there are 15 different female creators set to work on 16 different books in August, three fewer creators than in July and four fewer books. As best I can tell, there are no non-binary creators in this round of solicits. Dropping a few notches shouldn’t be too big a deal, but with so few creators to begin with these small drops are proportionally significant. Falling from 20 to 16 books, for instance, is a drop of 20%. That’s not small at all.

With the low output of the entire line, though, we need to contextualize the numbers. DC is putting out 58 new comics in August, and with female creators on 16 of them that means that women are involved in 28% of the publisher’s line. It was 32% last month, and 33% the month before that. While the numbers aren’t going off a cliff here, they’re certainly dropping after a generally steady run for the past few months. And keep in mind, steady numbers is just maintaining the total, with the same number of female and non-binary creators doing the same amount of work. Growth is preferable. Drops are disappointing.

Perhaps predictably, it’s a quiet month for new creators in the ranks. Silent, even. Every creator listed above is someone we’ve seen recently. This has been happening a lot lately at DC. With fewer books, the ranks are closed in now. A certain number of regulars get work, but the opportunity for new voices has been minimal.

August isn’t a great month for female characters either. The big news is yet another Batman/Superman book, which should be gorgeous thanks to David Marquez but I just don’t care about the Batman Who Laughs. He’s somehow both creepy and boring? I’m not into it. There is a new Wildcats book, with a few female characters on the team. And with Warren Ellis writing, it should be a good read. Otherwise, we’ve got a new Neal Adams Batman book that should be bonkers and some “Year of the Villian” specials featuring male villains.

Overall, it’s an underwhelming August for representation, real and fictional, at DC. New things might start rolling out soon with the fall solicits and maybe that will lift the numbers, but right now things are starting to trend downward. As much as it’s good to see more diversity in DC’s kids and teen graphic novels, that doesn’t mean they should just forget about doing the same in the single issue line.

Women & NB Creators at DC Comics Watch, July 2019 Solicits: 18 Creators on 20 Books

June 17, 2019

womenatdcJULY

July is a month with five Wednesdays, which usually means more comics from DC. Typically, we get annuals and other one-shot specials in that last week, since most of their ongoing books are released on a regular schedule (Wonder Woman is out on the second and fourth Wednesday of every month, for example), and there’s a bit of that here. But we’ve also got a lot of new books throughout the entire month, both ongoing and mini-series. DC trimmed back their line earlier this year, and now it seems to be growing again. Does that mean we’ll see more female and non-binary creators moving forward? Well, so far, no. Let’s take a look at who is doing what at DC this July:

  • Adriana Melo: Female Furies #6 (interior art)
  • Amanda Conner: Wonder Woman: Come Back To Me #1 (co-writer, cover)
  • Bilquis Evely: The Dreaming #11 (interior art)
  • Cecil Castellucci: Batgirl #37 (writer), Female Furies #6 (writer)
  • Emanuela Lupacchino: Wonder Twins #6 (variant cover)
  • G. Willow Wilson: Wonder Woman #74 (writer), Wonder Woman #75 (writer)
  • Jenny Frison: Lois Lane #1 (variant cover), Wonder Woman #74 (variant cover), Wonder Woman #75 (variant cover)
  • Joelle Jones: Catwoman #13 (writer, interior art, cover), Female Furies #6 (cover)
  • Kat Howard: The Books of Magic #10 (writer)
  • Kelly Sue DeConnick: Aquaman #50 (writer)
  • Lea H. Seidman: Teen Titans Go! #35 (cover)
  • Mairghread Scott: Batman Secret Files #2 (co-writer)
  • Nalo Hopkinson: House of Whispers #11 (co-writer)
  • Rachel Dodson: Justice League #28 (variant cover), Wonder Woman #75 (cover)
  • Sandra Hope: Superman: Up In The Sky #1 (inker)
  • Taki Soma: Pearl #11 (variant cover)
  • Tiffany Turrill: Lucifer #10 (cover)
  • Yasmine Putri: DCeased #3 (variant cover), Red Hood: Outlaw #36 (variant cover)

All together, there are 18 different female creators set to work on 20 different comic books at DC this July, the same number of creators as in June across three more books. As best I can tell, there are no non-binary creators listed in this round of solicits. Given that DC is putting out 11 more books in July than in June, the fact that the number of creators stayed the same is disappointing. As we’ve talked about over the past few months while DC’s output decreased, it’s reasonable to see a commensurate drop in the number of female and non-binary creators as the line dwindles. But you’d expect to see the numbers go up when it grows, which hasn’t happened here.

However, DC’s jumped up to 62 new books after putting out only 51 in June, and with female creators on 20 of those books, that means women will work on 32% of the publisher’s comics in July. This percentage is very comparable to what we’ve seen over the past few months. The overall representation across the line is steady, but there aren’t more women or non-binary creators doing the work. It’s a small number of people doing more work, which is a bit of a mixed bag. Talented creators should get lots of work, for sure! But it’s good to grow the ranks as well.

And DC didn’t do a lot of that this month. Lea H. Seidman looks new but she’s actually Lea Hernandez, who we’ve seen a bunch on Teen Titans Go!, now using her married name. And while I feel like we haven’t seen Taki Soma in a little bit, she’s nonetheless a familiar face at DC now that her pal and occasional collaborator Brian Michael Bendis is there. Everyone else are our wonderfully talented usuals.

In terms of female characters, we’ve got a couple new books to look forward to. DC’s repackaging their original Walmart comic stories for the direct market, which means new mini-series for Batman, Superman, and, most important of all, Wonder Woman with Wonder Woman: Come Back to Me. And the Superman line is expanding with a Lois Lane series, FINALLY. It’s long overdue and I really wish there were more female creators working on it, but I’m happy it’s going to exist nonetheless. Doom Patrol is coming back as well, with a few female characters in the mix there.

So, another ho-hum month at DC, really. Their numbers for female and non-binary creators have been consistently underwhelming all year long, and it looks like that’s going to continue into the summer. Representation just doesn’t seem to be a big priority at DC right now.

Wonder Woman #71 Review: A Colossal Discovery

May 22, 2019

ww71

We’ve had a bit of a talky go of it lately with Wonder Woman. Atlantiades is not the sort of villain you stop with fisticuffs, or even a villain at all, really. More an interesting conundrum, a deity in a strange place doing what only comes natural to them, seeking worship. And toying with mortals, of course. The gods are always toying with mortals. It’s brought us an interesting glimpse into Wonder Woman’s love life, along with some cool discussions on free will and happiness, and it’s all been quite excellent. That plot is largely resolved this week, but with little in the way of awesome punching and action fun.

That’s why it’s handy that Maggie and Aphrodite went off exploring and found a new foe. One that’s definitely going to need some punching. There’ll be no thoughtful, introspective discussions with this adversary. Just a classic beat ‘em up. I love that Wonder Woman is a book that can give us both. G. Willow Wilson’s dug into some heavy subject matter since she took over the series, but she’s also made time to have Diana bust up some rock giants and now what appears to be a massive living statue of some sort. That’s just quality comic booking all around. We’ll dig into it all, but first:

SPOILER ALERT!!

We’re going to discuss everything that happened in this issue!

Turn away if you haven’t read it yet!

Also, as always, you should be reading this book!

Before we get into all the fun, I don’t know who keeps telling Terry and Rachel Dodson that Steve Trevor is in the book, but he is not. And yet, he keeps showing up on the covers. He actually popped in for a scene or two a couple weeks back, but wasn’t on the cover then. And now he’s back on the cover once more, with nary a mention of the man inside the book. It’s such a nitpicky thing, I know, but I wonder about the disconnect. Was Steve supposed to be in the book at one point and plans got changed? Are the Dodsons just drawing what they think will look cool? I mean, their covers are always amazing. I’m not even annoyed. Just curious and confused.

Anyway, onto the story. We get a resolution of sorts with Atlantiades, as they realized what they’d hoped to achieve in the town had failed. They thought that letting people be free of the expectations of their ordinary lives and indulge in their desires would bring the town happiness, but it most definitely did not. Actions have consequences, and the weight of these consequences snapped the townsfolk out of Atlantiades’ spell. They got them back momentarily with a display of divine power, but Diana talked them out of continuing the experiment. Atlantiades is clearly dealing with a lot, including a strained relationship with their mother, and hopefully we can see some growth on that front moving forward. They’re a selfish character, but I think they have a good heart. They’re just a bit lost and hurt, and likely have been that way for centuries. I’m excited to see what they make of the opportunities in this new world, having learned from this experience, and I hope Wilson checks in on them from time to time if this town escapade is indeed wrapped up for now.

The only thing I didn’t like about the resolution was that Xermanico didn’t draw the last few pages of it. This is understandable. Bi-weekly comics are an insane grind and you’re going to get some fill-in pages. Tom Derenick and Scott Hanna stepped in to finish the scene, and while the artwork was serviceable, it failed to capture the characters well, especially Atlantiades. Xermanico brought a compelling androgyny to Atlantiades that befit their mythological background. Derenick and Hanna failed to replicate that, leaning much more into the feminine aspects of the character. Atlantiades ended up looking like a twin of Diana rather than the unique take Xermanico had obviously carefully developed.

Xermanico’s work on this arc has been exceptional, from character design to panel layout and beyond, and I’m sad that the strictures of the schedule prevented him from being able to close it out himself. As much as I love getting Wonder Woman twice a month, I deeply hate the onerous demands that bi-weekly books put on artists. This is a run that should be collected for years, even decades to come, and putting out subpar artwork now to fit this unreasonable schedule is a short term compromise that will lead to disappointment long term. I know nobody likes late books, but I feel like editorial could do a better job of planning out the artwork.

But I digress. There was a whole other story to this issue, with a dang colossus in it! At first I thought it was just a giant minotaur, but Aphrodite called it a colossus and the golden head confirms her words. This appears to be a massive statue brought to life somehow, perhaps with the same power that got us stone giants in the Rockies. As far as I can tell, this is an original invention by Wilson and not based on an existing statue or anything. There have been various colossal statues throughout history, most famously the Colossus of Rhodes, which was a statue of Helios, but none of them were a minotaur, I don’t think.

So yeah, we’ve got a fight on our hands now! I love that the sword has emboldened Maggie, and that she was prepared to take on the colossus by herself. She’s been a great addition to the cast, and I’ve enjoyed watching her trepidation give way to courage over the past few issues. Not even Aphrodite dared face off against the colossus, and she’s a dang god! Luckily Wonder Woman arrived just in the nick of time and now they can make a good fight of it. I’m excited to see them throw down in June, and to see what mysteries these underground pathways hold. Well, “underground.” I’m guessing there’s some dimensional travel at play or an underworld sort of situation. Either way, adventure awaits!

Women & NB Creators at Marvel Comics Watch, June 2019 Solicits: 35 Creators on 36 Books

May 16, 2019

womenatmarvelJUNE.png

On the one hand, Marvel will have nearly twice as many female and non-binary creators as DC this June. On the other hand, Marvel is also putting out nearly twice as many books as DC this June. It’s hard to compare the two publishers directly these days, but what’s undoubtedly true is that while DC’s got a core group of female creators in their solicits each month, Marvel’s got a wide ranging assortment of women and non-binary creators month in, month out, some well established on regular gigs and others breaking into the industry on smaller jobs. The breadth of the line means more opportunity, finally. So let’s take a look at the long list of who is doing what at Marvel this June:

  • Alitha E. Martinez: Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur #44 (interior art), Miles Morales: Spider-Man #7 (interior art)
  • Amanda Conner: Captain Marvel #6 (cover), Captain Marvel #7 (cover)
  • Annapaola Martello: Captain Marvel #6 (interior art), Captain Marvel #7 (interior art)
  • Annie Wu: War of the Realms: New Agents of Atlas #3 (variant cover)
  • Ashley Witter: Star Wars: Doctor Aphra #33 (cover)
  • Audrey Mok: Marvel Rising #4 (cover)
  • Becky Cloonan: Wolverine: Exit Wounds #1 (variant cover)
  • Charlie Jane Anders: War of the Realms: War Scrolls #3 (co-writer)
  • Elizabeth Torque: Black Cat #1 (variant cover)
  • Emanuela Lupacchino: Immortal Hulk #19 (variant cover)
  • Erica Henderson: The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl #45 (cover)
  • Eve L. Ewing: Ironheart #7 (writer), Marvel Team-Up #3 (writer)
  • Gail Simone: Domino: Hotshots #4 (writer), Tony Stark: Iron Man #13 (writer)
  • Gurihiru: The Unstoppable Wasp #9 (interior art)
  • Irina Nordsol: War of the Realms #6 (variant cover)
  • Jen Bartel: Guardians of the Galaxy Annual #1 (variant cover), Marvel Tales: Spider-Man #1 (cover), War of the Realms: Journey Into Mystery #4 (variant cover)
  • Jody Houser: Star Wars: Tie Fighter #3 (writer)
  • Kate Niemczyk: Age of Conan: Belit #4 (interior art)
  • Kelly Thompson: Captain Marvel #6 (writer), Captain Marvel #7 (writer), Mr. and Mrs. X #12 (writer)
  • Kirbi Fagan: Shuri #9 (cover)
  • Leah Williams: Age of X-Man: X-Tremists #5 (writer), Giant-Man #3 (writer)
  • Meredith Finch: Savage Sword of Conan #6 (writer)
  • Nilah Magruder: Marvel Rising #4 (writer)
  • Nnedi Okorafor: Shuri #9 (writer)
  • Rachael Stott: Shuri #9 (interior art)
  • Rachel Dodson: Star Wars: Age of Rebellion – Darth Vader #1 (cover), Star Wars: Age of Rebellion – Luke Skywalker #1 (cover)
  • Rainbow Rowell: Runaways #22 (writer)
  • Sana Takeda: Age of Conan: Belit #4 (cover)
  • Seanan McGuire: Age of X-Man: The Amazing Nightcrawler #5 (writer), Spider-Gwen: Ghost-Spider #9 (writer)
  • Stacey Lee: The Unstoppable Wasp #9 (cover)
  • Tini Howard: Age of Conan: Belit #4 (writer), Guardians of the Galaxy Annual #1 (co-writer), Thanos #3 (writer)
  • Vanesa Del Rey: Miles Morales: Spider-Man #7 (interior art)
  • Vita Ayala: Age of X-Man: Prisoner X #4 (writer)
  • Yasmine Putri: Thor #14 (variant cover)

All together, there are 35 different female and non-binary creators scheduled to work on 36 Marvel comic books in June, two more creators and one more book than in May. These are big numbers. Again, yes, Marvel is putting out a lot of books right now. But having a commensurate increase in female and non-binary creators while they do so is a pleasant surprise. The Big Two have not been good at that at all. Like, ever.

Speaking of the massive output, Marvel is planning to release 91 new issues in June. With female and non-binary creators working on 36 of them, that’s representation across 40% of the line, an increase of 5% from May. In comparison, DC is at 33%, so Marvel’s a bit ahead, if not starkly so.

It looks like we’ve got a few new creators in the mix as well. As best I can tell, Charlie Jane Anders is doing her first writing for Marvel in War of the Realms: War Scrolls #3, and while Meredith Finch had a long and quite frankly terrible run on Wonder Woman at DC, her gig on Savage Sword of Conan #6 appears to be a Marvel first, too. We’ve also got Russian artist Irina Nordsol doing a variant cover for War of the Realms #6. There are some returning favourites in the mix as well. We haven’t seen Alitha E. Martinez in a little while, it’s been even longer for Annapaola Martello, and it’s always good to see Annie Wu, Gurihiru, and Vanesa Del Rey back at Marvel.

June is a quiet month for new books, with War of the Realms winding down. Things should pick up over the summer, though, and I’m very curious to see what the X-Men relaunch and the cancellation/relaunch of the entire X-line will do to the numbers. But for now, we’ve got one female character on a new title, with Felicia Hardy taking center stage in a Black Cat ongoing series.

Overall, Marvel’s rolling along with relatively strong numbers for female and non-binary creators. As much as there’s always room to grow, the year thus far has shown nothing but sustained representation for writers and artists. I will note that the full numbers haven’t exactly followed suit. When you take into account the full credits, like I do quarterly in my women in comics statistics reports, Marvel’s numbers become a bit underwhelming. But here in the solicits, which are what sell the books, female and non-binary creators have been a solid constant this year.

Women & NB Creators at DC Comics Watch, June 2019 Solicits: 18 Creators on 17 Books

May 14, 2019

womenatdcJUNE.png

DC is really committed to putting out fewer books now. When they announced that they were cutting back, I was curious to see how long it would last, but they’re sticking with it. We saw a slight uptick in the May solicits, on account of it being a month with five Wednesdays, and now with the June solicits we’re back down again. Down so low, in fact, that it might be the fewest books DC has released since we started tracking these numbers several years back. And fewer books has meant a commensurate drop in female and non-binary creators, which continues this month. Let’s take a look at who is doing what at DC this June:

  • Adriana Melo: Female Furies #5 (interior art)
  • Amanda Conner: Supergirl #31 (variant cover)
  • Bilquis Evely: The Dreaming #10 (interior art)
  • Cecil Castellucci: Female Furies #5 (writer)
  • Elena Casagrande: Young Justice #6 (interior art)
  • Emanuela Lupacchino: Justice League #26 (variant cover)
  • G. Willow Wilson: Wonder Woman #72 (writer)
  • Jenny Frison: The Batman Who Laughs #6 (variant cover), Wonder Woman #72 (variant cover), Wonder Woman #73 (variant cover)
  • Joelle Jones: Catwoman #12 (writer, cover)
  • Kat Howard: The Books of Magic #9 (writer)
  • Kelly Sue DeConnick: Aquaman #49 (writer)
  • Mairghread Scott: Batgirl #36 (writer)
  • Nalo Hopkinson: House of Whispers #10 (co-writer)
  • Rachel Dodson: Wonder Woman #72 (cover)
  • Sandra Hope: The Silencer #18 (cover)
  • Stacey Lee: Wonder Twins #5 (variant cover)
  • Tiffany Turrill: Lucifer #9 (cover)
  • Yasmine Putri: Red Hood: Outlaw #35 (variant cover)

All together, there are 18 different female creators scheduled to work on 17 different comics in June, three fewer creators than in May and one fewer book. As best I can tell, there are no non-binary creators listed in this round of solicits. Given that DC’s dropped from 62 books in May to 51 in June, falling from 21 female creators to 18 seems like a reasonable result. Growth would be preferred, of course, but the publisher is maintaining the same level here.

With the new reductions to the line, we’ve been keeping track of representation on a per book basis, in part due to the fluctuations and in part to have a more accurate comparison with Marvel’s more robust line. With women working on 17 of DC’s 51 titles this month, we’ve got female creators on 33% of the line, which is a slight step up from May’s 29% and very near their 31% level from April. If nothing else, DC is consistent.

In terms of new names at the publisher in this round of solicits, we’ve got one. Stacey Lee is doing a variant cover, and she’s been a mainstay at Marvel for a little while now. Everyone else listed above is someone we’ve seen recently at DC. I think this is an unintended consequence of reducing the line so much. With fewer books, editors are likely to stick with the creators they know and rely on established talent to make sure the limited selection sells well. This means fewer opportunities for new and emerging creators, and doubly so for new and emerging female and non-binary creators, who already have a more difficult road making it into a major superhero publisher. It’s a shame that the limited number of entry points into creating superhero comic books have been reduced even further. That’s really going to hurt the development of new talent, and make it more difficult for this list to grow.

June is a quiet month for female characters as well. The blockbuster Event Leviathan is set to launch, and I understand that Lois Lane is going to be a big part of that, which is cool. The first solicit mentions Talia al Ghul as well. Apart from that, the only other new series is the prestige format Superman Year One, which looks very terrible. Frank Miller’s never written Superman well, and John Romita Jr. was an odd fit for the Man of Steel back when he was on the regular series. Lois will probably show up in that book eventually, too, though with Miller writing it all I’d honestly rather she didn’t.

So overall we’ve got another steady if underwhelming month from DC Comics. Female and non-binary creators don’t seem to be a priority for the publisher, and they’ve certainly made no moves with their June plans to expand the ranks. It looks like they’re good with the limited (albeit excellent) assortment they have now, and while the steadiness is better than losses, it’s still rather disappointing. Perhaps the summer will bring some changes? You never know.

Women & NB Creators at Marvel Comics Watch, May 2019 Solicits: 33 Creators on 35 Books

April 22, 2019

womenatmarvelMAY.png

Marvel’s solid 2019 is set to continue in May as the publisher’s female and non-binary creator representation remains high. It’s a stability we’re not used to seeing at Marvel, but it’s a welcome change. There’s been a strong core of creators with regular gigs thus far this year, as well as a rotating group of creators who bounce from specials to minis to random ongoing issues and help keep the numbers high. And they’re even higher now. Let’s take a look at who’s doing what at Marvel in May:

  • Alti Firmansyah: The Unstoppable Wasp #7 (interior art), The Unstoppable Wasp #8 (interior art)
  • Amanda Conner: Captain Marvel #5 (cover)
  • Ashley Witter: Star Wars: Doctor Aphra #32 (cover), X-23 #12 (cover)
  • Audrey Mok: Marvel Rising #3 (cover)
  • Carmen Carnero: Captain Marvel #5 (interior art)
  • Devin Grayson: War of the Realms: War Scrolls #2 (co-writer)
  • Erica Henderson: The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl #33 (cover)
  • Eve L. Ewing: Ironheart #6 (writer), Marvel Team-Up #2 (writer)
  • Gail Simone: Domino: Hotshots #3 (writer), Tony Stark: Iron Man #12 (writer)
  • Jen Bartel: Black Panther #12 (interior art), Marvel Tales: Avengers #1 (cover), Marvel Tales: Iron Man #1 (cover), Thanos #2 (variant cover)
  • Jen Soska: Black Widow #5 (co-writer)
  • Jody Houser: Star Wars: Tie Fighter #2 (writer)
  • Kate Niemczyk: Age of Conan: Belit #3 (interior art)
  • Kelly Thompson: Captain Marvel #5 (writer), Mr. and Mrs. X #11 (writer)
  • Kirbi Fagan: Shuri #8 (cover)
  • Leah Williams: Age of X-Man: X-Tremists #4 (writer), Giant-Man #1 (writer), Giant-Man #2 (writer)
  • Mariko Tamaki: X-23 #12 (writer)
  • Michelle Delecki: Age of X-Man: The Amazing Nightcrawler #4 (cover)
  • Natacha Bustos: Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur #43 (cover)
  • Nilah Magruder: Marvel Rising #3 (writer)
  • Nnedi Okorafor: Shuri #8 (writer)
  • Rachael Stott: Shuri #8 (interior art)
  • Rachel Dodson: Star Wars: Age of Rebellion – Boba Fett #1 (cover), Star Wars: Age of Rebellion – Han Solo #1 (cover), Star Wars: Age of Rebellion – Jabba the Hutt #1 (cover), Star Wars: Age of Rebellion – Lando Calrissian #1 (cover)
  • Rainbow Rowell: Runaways #21 (writer)
  • Sana Takeda: Age of Conan: Belit #3 (cover)
  • Seanan McGuire: Age of X-Man: The Amazing Nightcrawler #4 (writer), Spider-Gwen: Ghost-Spider #8 (writer)
  • Stacey Lee: The Unstoppable Wasp #7 (cover), The Unstoppable Wasp #8 (cover)
  • Stephanie Hans: Age of Conan: Belit #3 (variant cover), Marvels Annotated #4 (variant cover), Star Wars: Doctor Aphra #32 (variant cover)
  • Sujin Jo: Amazing Spider-Man #21 (variant cover), Magnificent Ms. Marvel #3 (variant cover), Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur #43 (variant cover), The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl #33 (variant cover), The Unstoppable Wasp #7 (variant cover)
  • Sylvia Soska: Black Widow #5 (co-writer)
  • Tini Howard: Age of Conan: Belit #3 (writer), Thanos #2 (writer)
  • Vita Ayala: Age of X-Man: Prisoner X #3 (writer)
  • Yasmine Putri: Star Wars: Age of Rebellion – Han Solo #1 (variant cover)

All together, there are 33 female and non-binary creators set to work on 35 different books at Marvel in May, two more creators than in April across five more books. The lengthy list above is an amazing compilation of talented creators, and the publisher had done a solid job keeping a solid portion of them employed across the line for several months running now. They’re working throughout the books as well. A lot of covers, as always, but a lot of writers, too, and a growing number of interior artists.

We’re also now keeping track of the number of books as well, what with DC cutting back their line and Marvel appearing to expand theirs. They’re set to publish 99 books in May, a massive numbers of titles. With female and non-binary creators working on 35 different books, that accounts for representation on a smidge over 35% of the books, which is a drop of 4% from April. Marvel is set to publish twenty additional issues in May, and they haven’t hired women or non-binary creators at a proportional rate for all of these new books, which is somewhat disappointing to see.

For new names, we’ve got Sujin Jo on several variant covers. I should also point out that there are a slew of Asian artists working on other variant covers across the line and, while I’ve been able to track down some of them, a few remain mysteries to me and I can’t determine their gender. Most of them are based in Asia, with websites in their native languages, and I can’t glean the information I need. So there may be even more new female and non-binary creators in the mix. I’m going to keep searching, and hopefully I can track everyone down in time for my more detailed full stats count.

May isn’t a big month for new female creators, apart from team books. Elektra is in Savage Avengers, while a range of War of the Realms tie-ins have Black Widow, Captain Marvel, Freyja, Ms. Marvel, She-Hulk, Silk, and a handful more superheroines in the mix.

Overall, while Marvel’s numbers for female and non-binary creators aren’t exactly keepin up with May’s big jump in titles, representation remains high at the publisher. And across a wide range of books as well, not just ones headlined by female characters. It’s been a relatively impressive run for Marvel, and we’ll be back next month to see if it continues.


%d bloggers like this: