Wonder Woman Movie Action Figures: Reviewing the Entire Fantastic Line!

June 22, 2017

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I don’t know how things are where you live, but here in Halifax it’s been hard to track down the DC Multiverse line of Wonder Woman movie action figures. Luckily, I have a sister who lives near the American border and was able to order the entire line up! And she brought them all last night (the picture above doesn’t include Hippolyta, because I was able to get that one earlier), so now I have the entire set. And they are GREAT. I’m hoping it’s just the beginning of the line because there are definitely a few missing characters I’d love to see, but it’s a fantastic start. As an action figure enthusiast, I’m really pleased with the quality of the work here. So let’s take a closer look at all of them!

We’ll start with the main Wonder Woman figure:

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Honestly, it’s kind of an odd figure with the cloak and all. I understand that the Multiverse line did a (not so great) Wonder Woman figure for Batman v Superman last year so they’d want to mix it up a bit here, but this one is hard to play with. Also, full disclosure, I am 100% a take it out of the package sort of dude, so playability is key for me. Still, it’s a pretty nice figure. She comes with her sword and her lasso (which is hidden under her cloak) and the costume underneath the cloak is very nicely done. The face sculpt is decent as well. It’d be a better figure if the cloak was removable, though. I know she wears it for a lot of the movie, but it’s hard to play with.

Luckily, there’s a Wonder Woman variant figure that’s a Toys R Us exclusive, and it’s awesome:

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It’s the Batman v Superman sculpt with brighter colours and a new face, and it’s a vast improvement on both that original figure and her cloaked counterpart in the Wonder Woman line. She looks a lot more like Gal Gadot, and she’s got a variety of points of articulation that make her easy to play with. Her accessories are rad too; while we’ve got the standard sword and lasso, the shield is the most impressive piece here. It’s a detailed, accurate recreation of the movie shield that will allow you to stage all kinds of fun poses from the film. If you want a good Wonder Woman figure, I suggest going to Toys R Us and tracking this one down.

We’ve got a third Diana, in her Themyscira outfit:

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She comes with the sword and lasso yet again, but everything else is new including an alternative head sculpt with a braid and of course an entirely different costume. The figure is very poseable, and looks good all around. It’s a great representation of her Themyscira look, and with some other Amazons in the line you can recreate some sparring scenes! It’s a simple figure, but a fun one.

Queen Hippolyta is slightly more ornate:

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They did a great job with the costume here, capturing all of the elements quite nicely. She’s got a cloak as well, which makes playing with her a little bit difficult, but it’s not as cumbersome as the black cloak on the main Wonder Woman figure. The figure also comes with a sword and a spear; all of the weapons in this line look good, plus they’re fairly sturdy and easy to put in the figure’s hands, which is always helpful. Hippolyta’s face sculpt makes her look a bit stern, but that’s in keeping with the character, really.

Our final Amazon is Menalippe:

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And honestly I have NO idea why she has a figure and Antiope doesn’t. That makes no sense at all. But it’s a super cool figure nonetheless! She comes with a spear as well, but I’ve got her in this awesome bow and arrow pose. The costume looks great, the weapons are cool, and she’s pretty good to play with despite some limitations due to the length of parts of her skirt. It’s a fun figure all around. I just don’t know why she’s not Antiope. Maybe we’ll get one in a future line!

Now onto the boys, starting with Steve Trevor:

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He’s fine. This was never going to be a super exciting figure, since he lacks the visual flair and cool weaponry of the Amazons. He’s got a gun and that’s about it. And that green jacket isn’t exactly a stunning outfit. But the textures aren’t bad and for the simple figure it is, it looks pretty decent and is good to pose and play with. He’ll look good running behind my Wonder Woman figure!

And finally, the Ares build-a-figure:

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So, I think the filmmakers changed their mind on how Ares should look during production because both this figure and the Lego Ares look like this, with old fashioned armor and a ram skull helmet and such, and his look in the movie is kind of different. The toys must have been developed so far that they couldn’t change things when the movie did, and so we get this figure that’s not terribly movie accurate. The good news is, I think the figure looks a lot cooler than the movie version! He’s kind of awesome. I’ve got him pictured with one of the fiery swords that come with Menalippe and the shield that comes with the Toys R Us exclusive Wonder Woman, but there’s another sword that comes with someone in the main line that’s fine as well. He was easy to build and very fun to put together. I’ve never collected a full line before, so I’ve never made a build-a-figure. It’s fun! And he’s bigger than everyone else, which is cool for a bad guy. Here’s a comparison shot:

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It’s a great Ares all around, and he’s a blast to play with.

There are a few figures I’d love to see in a hypothetical second line, Antiope first and foremost among them. It’s bizarre that she’s not in this line. It’d be fun to have an Etta as well; she was such a joy in the movie, and I’d love to pair her with one of my Wonder Women. Dr. Poison would be cool too, to give us another villain, and perhaps a Ludendorff for the same reasons. I’d also be okay with a Diana Prince figure, in her London garb, just to have another Wonder Woman in the line. Sameer, Charlie, and Chief I can take or leave. It’d be fun to have the team, but there are other characters that I think would be more fun. So hopefully there’s more coming! But if not, this line is great and there’s a lot of fantastic figures in the mix.

Women at Marvel Comics Watch – August 2017 Solicits, 25 Women on 24 Books

June 21, 2017

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The good news for Marvel’s August releases is that they have the highest number of female creators in the mix since March. The less good news is that the publisher is still a long way off from those March highs, continuing to languish in the mid-20s after they began the year firmly in the mid-30s. Basically, the numbers are higher than last month but not nearly as high as Marvel has showed they are capable of achieving. Let’s take a look at who’s doing what at Marvel in August 2017:

  • Amy Reeder: Star Wars #35 (variant cover)
  • Becky Cloonan: The Punisher #15 (writer)
  • Christina Strain: Generation X #5 (writer)
  • Elizabeth Torque: Astonishing X-Men #2 (variant cover), Generations: Hawkeye & Hawkeye #1 (cover), The Mighty Captain Marvel #8 (cover)
  • Elsa Charretier: The Unstoppable Wasp #8 (cover)
  • Erica Henderson: The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl #23 (interior art, cover)
  • G. Willow Wilson: Ms. Marvel #21 (writer)
  • Gabby Rivera: America #6 (co-writer)
  • Gurihiru: Gwenpool, the Unbelievable #19 (interior art, cover)
  • Hannah Blumenreich: Spider-Gwen #23 (co-writer, interior art)
  • Jen Bartel: America #6 (cover)
  • Jill Thompson: Lockjaw: Dog Days #1 (co-writer, interior art)
  • Jody Houser: Star Wars: Rogue One Adaptation #5 (writer)
  • Kamome Shirahama: Star Wars: Doctor Aphra #11 (cover)
  • Kelly Thompson: America #6 (co-writer), Generations: Hawkeye & Hawkeye #1 (writer), Hawkeye #9 (writer)
  • Margaret Stohl: The Mighty Captain Marvel #8 (writer)
  • Mariko Tamaki: Hulk #9 (writer)
  • Natacha Bustos: Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur #22 (interior art, cover)
  • Ro Stein: The Unstoppable Wasp #8 (interior art)
  • Sara Pichelli: Spider-Men II #2 (interior art, cover)
  • Stephanie Hans: Generations: Phoenix & Jean Grey #1 (cover)
  • Tamra Bonvillain: Secret Warriors #5 (cover)
  • Yona Harvey: Black Panther and the Crew #6 (co-writer)
  • Yusaku Komiyama: Zombies Assemble 2 #1 (writer, interior art)

All together, there are 25 different female creators set to work on 24 different comic books in August, 1 more woman and 2 more books than in July. It’s a small step up from last month, as well as Marvel’s highest combined total since March. However, March had 37 different female creators on 33 different books, so Marvel’s still running very far behind where they were earlier in the year. The numbers dropped off precipitously in April, and they haven’t recovered a whole lot since then.

There are a couple of new names in the mix for August, though. We haven’t seen Ro Stein at Marvel before, and I think she’ll be a great fit on The Unstoppable Wasp. Tamra Bonvillain is also credited on a cover, even though she’s a colorist and colorists generally don’t get credited in the solicits. But if your name is in there, you make the list! So hooray for Tamra Bonvillain, who I actually come across a lot when I do my full “Gendercrunching” stats each month. It’s nice to see a colorist make the solicits for a change.

In terms of new books, Marvel’s Generations event has several female characters involved in special oneshot issues. The event focuses on different incarnations of the same hero, so for example the current, female Mighty Thor is paired with the old Thor, who’s now known as Unworthy Thor. Women are in the mix in four of the oneshots, including Hawkeye (the cooler lady one), All New Wolverine (also the cooler lady one), and both Phoenix and the new, young Jean Grey together in their own book. Marvel’s recent penchant for replacing male heroes with women has ensured that this event will have a considerable female presence throughout, which is very fun. It’s also great to see creators associated with the characters in the mix, including Kelly Thompson, the writer of the current, fantastic Hawkeye series, penning the special Generations: Hawkeye & Hawkeye issue.

So all together, female representation looks like it will be slightly improved at Marvel this August, but behind the scenes the gains are slight and on the page the gains are cool but momentary via an assortment of oneshots. It’s bizarre that Marvel can’t seem to get out of its current mid-20s rut with female creators; they were really hitting it out of the park as the year began, but the numbers just aren’t there anymore.

New Wonder Woman Arc to Focus on her Brother OR No One Wants This

June 20, 2017

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DC Comics announced a new creative team for their Wonder Woman comic yesterday, with James Robinson coming on board to write the book alongside Carlos Pagulayan and Emanuela Lupacchino on art. They’re going to do a six-issue arc that will run bi-monthly from September through December, and it will pick up on threads first introduced in DC’s “Rebirth” special a year ago. The solicit for the first issue says:

Who is Wonder Woman’s brother? Taken away from Themyscira in the dead of night, the mysterious Jason has been hidden somewhere far from the sight of gods and men…but his life and Wonder Woman’s are about to intersect in a terrifying way, bringing them face to face with a cosmic threat they never imagined!

I am underwhelmed, to say the least. Wonder Woman has been stellar since its “Rebirth” relaunch, with Greg Rucka, Bilquis Evely, Nicola Scott, and Liam Sharp revitalizing the character and setting her on a good path after several rough years following the book’s previous relaunch in 2011. Shea Fontana and Mirka Andolfo are set to take over the book in July for five issues, and that sounds like it’s going to be a fun run. I was pleased to see a female writer take over the series, and Mirka Andolfo’s art is always a treat. But now we’ve got a male writer at the helm again (and one with a problematic writing record at that). We do have Emanuela Lupacchino on art, and she’s marvelous, but the solicit is all about “legendary writer James Robinson,” along with credits over a decade old, and doesn’t mention the art at all. Robinson is also focusing on Wonder Woman’s mysterious brother, a bizarre turn that shows DC seems to have learned nothing from the success of the Wonder Woman movie.

First, with so many amazing female writers working in comics right now, DC should be handing over the reins of Wonder Woman to one of them long term. The book has had some great male writers over the years, and Rucka’s tenure over the past year was fantastic, but it’s time for a new perspective on the book. Men have written Wonder Woman for the vast majority of her seventy-six year history. Meanwhile, giving the Wonder Woman film to Patty Jenkins gave Warner Bros. its first critically acclaimed superhero film in years because she brought something new to the table. DC should do the same with the book and bring in one of the many amazing women working in comics right now.

Second, a brother? Has DC not seen any of the responses from folks coming out of the Wonder Woman movie? No one left the theater thinking that there needed to be more men in the mix. They wanted more Diana, more Amazons, more Etta, more of all of the amazing women that made up the film. Introducing Diana’s brother is the last thing anyone wants right now. Long term fans of the comic have been loving the female-centric storyline of the “Rebirth” era thus far, while potential new fans curious about the character after the movie are going to have no interest whatsoever in some new dude.

The brother angle was a weird idea from the start. When the “Rebirth” special came out a year ago, the tease struck me as a fundamentally dumb move. Diana is a unique creation, the only child of the Amazons. To introduce a sibling is unnecessary enough (unless they brought back Nubia, which could be cool if done right), but to make it a male sibling just totally misses the point of having Amazons in your universe. They let you tell cool stories about women! DC doesn’t need to stick a man in there; they can do fun things with the amazing women that they already have.

The people inside DC Comics can be dopes sometimes. Wonder Woman has never been more popular. The movie is a smash hit! And they’re putting out a comic book that’s going to appeal to few if any of her fans, new or old. It reminds me of 1973, when DC returned Wonder Woman to her Amazon roots after she appeared on the first cover of Ms. Magazine and became a mascot of the women’s lib movement. Just like today, Wonder Woman was hugely famous outside of the comics, but DC handed the book to Robert Kanigher, an old white guy who ignored her new status and wrote a bunch of lazy, subpar issues that failed to capitalize on her popularity. Four decades later, DC is making the same mistakes.

Part of me is hoping that this is some ill-considered cleanup operation, that editorial is thinking, “Let’s deal with this seed we planted a year ago and then get on to a cool, different creative team in the New Year.” Maybe they’re just burning off three months of comics to follow up on this story that absolutely no one is clamoring for and they’ve got a great team lined up after that. That would be a dumb plan; better to just let the seed die. But at least it would be a plan with something better in the future. As is, this is just dumb and ill-timed, as well as a big missed opportunity to make the most of a huge moment for Wonder Woman. Even if this somehow turns out to be a decent story, which seems very unlikely but you never know, it’s just the wrong direction for the book right now. Put women in charge of Wonder Woman with women on the pages, please.

The Many Lives of Catwoman Moments, Week Seven: Family, Friends, and Foes

June 19, 2017

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My new book The Many Lives of Catwoman: The Felonious History of a Feline Fatale is officially out on June 1 (though some stores and online retailers have it available already!) and in advance of its release I’ve been posting key moments from Catwoman’s history on Tumblr. The posts go up twice a day, showcasing random scenes from her unique past across comics, movies, television, and more. Some are silly, some are significant, and several of them are both. Every post is a sneak peek inside all of the fun that the book covers in depth.

Last week, the ten moments that we looked at included:

And finally, my favourite Catwoman moment of the week from Detective Comics #521 in December 1982, written by Gerry Conway with art by Irv Novick and Sal Trapani. Catwoman became a major player in the Bat-books in the 1980s, first dating Bruce Wayne and later dating Batman (all while remaining in the dark that they were one and the same). But their relationship was a tumultuous one with many breakups, and during one of these separations Bruce began to date Vicki Vale. This did not go over well with Catwoman. She made threatening phone calls to Vicki, and in this issue she showed up at her house, yelled at her, and hit her with her whip. The stalking continued after this; soon after, Catwoman ran Bruce and Vicki off the road when they were out for a romantic drive. It was a bizarre period for Catwoman, and not one of her proudest moments. While it was nice to see Catwoman in such a prominent role, the various writers who handled her over this decade sometimes failed to do her justice, like in this arc when they engaged in gendered stereotypes and turned her into a jealous, unhinged ex-girlfriend.

You can check out all of the Catwoman moments here, and follow along for more Catwoman fun twice a day! You can order the book now as well, and explore the fascinating history of Catwoman with this fun, in depth book!

Wonder Woman #24 Review: Tragedies on Multiple Fronts in the Run’s Penultimate Issue

June 14, 2017

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We’re nearing the end of this current, excellent run of Wonder Woman, and everything has come together. After four disparate arcs, connected with small moments but kept separate by time, everything’s now merged. Wonder Woman #24 picks up where Wonder Woman #23 left off, a common occurrence for most comic books but an oddity for the dual narratives that have been so key to Wonder Woman since the “Rebirth” relaunch. And now, after 24 issues of surprises and revelations, the full run has taken its toll on everyone. Pretty much every major player in the series is facing tragedy, a crucible that has revealed the true nature of each of them in their responses to these trying circumstances. We’ll dig into it all, but first:

SPOILER ALERT!!

I am about to reveal all of the key events of this issue!

Look away if you haven’t read it yet!

Also, if you haven’t read it yet, you should!

This has been one of the best runs of Wonder Woman ever!

So let’s run through where everyone is at, and how recent events have affected them. The last issue revealed that Wonder Woman must remain permanently separated from her home and her family, and the shock of that is clear initially. She leaves the island gate to Themyscira without tracking down the Cheetah, an uncharacteristic decision for her that suggests she was emotionally drained and perhaps overwhelmed by all she’d been through. She seems almost in shock when she returns to America, somewhat quiet and withdrawn, until Etta chastises her for leaving Barbara behind. Etta’s words hit her hard and shake her out of her fog, putting her back on track. Despite the weight of her tragic separation, Wonder Woman always cares for others more than herself and goes after Barbara.

She finds her attacking Veronica Cale, which puts Wonder Woman in a difficult spot. She wants to help Barbara and she has so reason to care about Veronica Cale, who’s spent years trying to ruin both her life and the life of her friend. And yet, when Barbara promises she’ll go with Wonder Woman if she lets her kill Veronica, Wonder Woman refuses. She won’t let anyone die, no matter how guilty they may be. While tragedy shook Wonder Woman for a moment, she quickly returned to her heroic form, even though it meant another tragic loss for herself as her friend Barbara refused to go with her willingly.

As for Barbara, her tragic loss consumes her entirely. And really, justifiably so. She’s had an awful time of things. She was restored to her true self, leaving her Cheetah identity behind, but then returned to her Cheetah form to help her friends in a noble sacrifice. Her rejection from Themyscira is the breaking point for her. She’d searched for the Amazons for her entire life and was close to them, finally, only to have the gate disappear. So she lets all of her anger and the sorrow over the many things she’s lost consume her. She goes after Veronica, aiming to kill her, and very nearly succeeds. Had Wonder Woman not intervened, Veronica would have been a goner. Then, even in the face of Wonder Woman offering her help and a return to her life with Etta, she refuses. We’ve seen a lot of Barbara as the Cheetah in these 24 issues, and while her feral identity often dominated her, Etta was the one thing that always gave her pause. But not now. The mention of Etta barely dissuades her at all, and she refuses to go with Wonder Woman unless she’s allowed to kill Veronica. The series of tragedies she’s endured were too much in that moment and overcame her true nature, though perhaps we’ll see things turn around for her in two weeks time with the grand finale.

I’m not expecting a turnaround for Veronica. We’ve gotten to know her well this year, especially in “Godwatch” with Bilquis Evely bringing such life and emotion to the character. She was a woman who lost her daughter, an understandable motivation even though it took her to very dark places. But now her daughter is gone for good, and the weight of both her loss and her actions over the past year lie heavy on her. She’s lost her daughter, her company is in shambles, and she’s isolating herself further from the few friends she has. When the Cheetah calls her a villain, she doesn’t even flinch, as if she too knows what she’s become and is perhaps beginning to accept that this is who she is now. Tragedy has brought her emptiness, rightly so in many respects; she’s earned what’s coming to her. But however justified a punishment may be, the attack from Cheetah is especially brutal. Evely illustrates the horror of it well, from the gashes on her back to the violent action of the scene. And the most brutal moment of it all is the very end of the issue, with Veronica left all alone. Wonder Woman’s compassion and moral code saved her life, but her torn up body, left in solitude, stands as a monument to her inevitable tragic end.

Well, the end for now. There’s one more issue to come, with Greg Rucka, Bilquis Evely, and Liam Sharp teaming up for a grand finale that will tie up all of the loose threads. I wouldn’t be surprised if we saw Veronica involved in some way, though if we don’t then this was a fitting conclusion for the character. It looks like Cheetah will be a big focus, since Wonder Woman knocks her out and takes her away at the end of this issue. With all of the mysteries solved and so much wrapped up already, I’m curious to see what the final issue will dig into. The conclusions of both the “The Truth” and “Godwatch” have been excellent and satisfying, so I’m excited to see how the creative teams decides to leave everyone moving forward.

Women at DC Comics Watch – August 2017 Solicits, 29 Women on 22 Books

June 13, 2017

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Despite a lack of female creators in several new series, mini-series and one-shots set to premiere in August, representation for women at DC Comics remained relatively strong across their wider range of books. Growth throughout the spring has led to a solid plateau at the publisher, though some changes are on the way that may soon change that this fall. Let’s take a look at who’s doing what at DC this August:

  • Amanda Conner: Harley Quinn #25 (co-writer, cover), Harley Quinn #26 (co-writer, cover)
  • Aneke: DC Comics Bombshells #32 (interior art)
  • Becky Cloonan: Gotham Academy: Second Semester #12 (co-writer), Shade, the Changing Girl #11 (cover)
  • Carmen Carnero: Detective Comics #963 (interior art)
  • Cecil Castellucci: Shade, the Changing Girl #11 (writer)
  • Eleanora Carlini: Green Arrow Annual #1 (interior art)
  • Emanuela Lupacchino: Scooby Apocalypse #16 (variant cover)
  • Hope Larson: Batgirl #14 (writer)
  • Jenny Frison: Wonder Woman #28 (variant cover), Wonder Woman #29 (variant cover)
  • Jody Houser: Mother Panic #10 (writer)
  • Julie Benson: Batgirl and the Birds of Prey #13 (co-writer)
  • K. Perkins: Superwoman #13 (writer)
  • Kamome Shirahama: Batgirl and the Birds of Prey #13 (variant cover)
  • Laura Braga: DC Comics Bombshells #32 (interior art), DC Comics Bombshells #33 (interior art)
  • Lea Hernandez: Teen Titans Go! #23 (interior art)
  • Leslie Hung: Shade, the Changing Girl #11 (variant cover)
  • Lilah Sturges: Everafter: From the Pages of Fables #12 (co-writer)
  • Marguerite Bennett: Batwoman #6 (co-writer), DC Comics Bombshells #32 (writer), DC Comics Bombshells #33 (writer)
  • Marguerite Sauvage: Shade, the Changing Girl #11 (interior art)
  • Marley Zarcone: Shade, the Changing Girl #11 (interior art)
  • Michelle Delecki: Deathstroke #22 (variant cover), The New Gods Special #1 (interior art, cover)
  • Mirka Andolfo: DC Comics Bombshells #32 (interior art, cover), DC Comics Bombshells #33 (interior art)
  • Msassyk: Gotham Academy: Second Semester #12 (interior art)
  • Sana Takeda: Mother Panic #10 (variant cover)
  • Sandra Hope: Gotham Academy: Second Semester #12 (inker)
  • Shawna Benson: Batgirl and the Birds of Prey #13 (co-writer)
  • Shea Fontana: Wonder Woman #28 (writer), Wonder Woman #29 (writer)
  • Tula Lotay: Everafter: From the Pages of Fables #12 (cover)
  • Yasmine Putri: The Hellblazer #13 (variant cover)

All together, there are 29 different female creators set to work on 22 different books in August, 2 more women than in July though 1 less book. DC’s hit a decent level as of late, with the number of women on their books ranging from 27 to 31 over the past four months. In terms of both their own past performances and the numbers from their main competitor, this is a relatively good plateau.

It’s not a huge month for new names, though. Leslie Hung and Sana Takeda are the only two here, both of them on variant covers. We haven’t seen Michelle Delecki in a while either, but everyone else has been around recently. This lack of new women, and of new gigs generally, is somewhat odd given how many different series, mini-series and one-shots are scheduled for August. There are 11 new #1 issues, only one of which features a female creator, so that’s a rather dispiriting ratio.

Female characters aren’t a huge part of these new books either. Where they do appear, it’s in group settings; Wonder Woman looks to have a role in Dark Nights: Metal, and Suicide Squad Black Files seems to include Enchantress and Katana. We’ve got a new Mister Miracle book as well that should feature a lot of Big Barda, but her name’s not in the title. There’s also six one-shots that celebrate Jack Kirby, none of which star a female character.

Overall, August looks to be relatively solid for women at DC, but change may be around the corner. One key difference moving forward will be the end of Gotham Academy: Second Semester, which ships its final issue in August. That book has been a bastion for female creators at DC, and we may see its loss reflected in the numbers. The fall could bring even more new books as well, and given how few women are involved with August’s new offerings, that may not be great for the numbers either. We’ll see what the solicits bring. But for now, August is looking relatively strong for female representation at DC, at least.

The Many Lives of Catwoman Moments, Week Six: Secretaries, Sidekicks, and Schemes

June 12, 2017

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In advance of my new book The Many Lives of Catwoman: The Felonious History of a Feline Fatale officially coming out on July 1 (and already available now at several stores and online retailers!), I’ve been posting key moments from Catwoman’s unique history on Tumblr. It’s a random assortment of comic book panels and film stills, some fun and silly, some important and significant, and many that are both. Each offers a sneak peek at all of the different, intriguing incarnations of Catwoman that the book covers. And this week, with the book’s release date so near, we moved from daily posts to two a day, doubling our Catwoman fun!

Last week, the ten moments we looked at included:

And finally, my favourite Catwoman moment of the week as shown above, is Michelle Pfeiffer as Selina Kyle in Batman Returns. Her Catwoman was phenomenal, of course, but a big part of what made that villainous turn so good was how well Pfeiffer played Selina as a mousey wallflower as the film began. In just a few short scenes, Pfeiffer captured the secretary’s lonely, downtrodden nature perfectly, added just enough hints of charm to make her later transition into Catwoman a believable change. It was a brand new take on Selina Kyle, and one that could have come off clichéd or tacky in the wrong hands, but Pfeiffer made it work spectacularly, grounding her in a string of sorrows while adding a bit of camp to fit the odd tone of the Burton films. Everyone remembers her fantastic take on Catwoman, but her Selina Kyle was marvelous as well.

You can check out all of the Catwoman moments here, and follow along for more Catwoman fun! Two a day posts will continue for the next few weeks, so be sure to check that out. And you can order the book now as well to learn all about this fascinating feline fatale!


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