Women & NB Creators at Marvel Comics Watch, September 2018 Solicits: 26 Creators on 21 Books

July 19, 2018

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After what has been a rough year thus far for female and non-binary creator representation at Marvel, the publisher seems to have settled into a bit of a groove now. Unconventionally, too. Maybe about half of the gigs listed below are steady, ongoing jobs. The rest are variant covers, one-shots, or mini-series, positions that don’t last for long. And yet, Marvel’s keeping their numbers steady on the backs of such gigs. More long-term work would be nice to see, and the publisher does remain well below their past highs, but at least they’ve pulled themselves up from the terrible numbers they were posting earlier in the year. Let’s take a look at who’s doing what at Marvel this September:

  • Agnes Garbowska: Marvel Super Hero Adventures: Captain Marvel – First Day of School #1 (cover)
  • Ashley Witter: Star Wars: Doctor Aphra #24 (cover), Star Wars: Doctor Aphra Annual #2 (variant cover)
  • Becky Cloonan: Moon Knight #199 (cover)
  • Carmen Carnero: X-Men Red #8 (interior art)
  • Devin Grayson: Marvel Rising: Omega #1 (writer)
  • Emanuela Lupacchino: Avengers #7 (variant cover)
  • Erica Henderson: The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl #36 (cover)
  • Eve Venture: Avengers #7 (variant cover)
  • G. Willow Wilson: Ms. Marvel #34 (writer)
  • Gail Simone: Domino #6 (writer), Domino Annual #1 (co-writer)
  • Gurihiru: Marvel Rising: Omega #1 (cover)
  • Helen Chen: Marvel Rising: Omega #1 (variant cover)
  • Jenny Frison: X-Men Red #8 (cover)
  • Jody Houser: Amazing Spider-Man: Renew Your Vows #23 (writer)
  • Kelly Thompson: West Coast Avengers #2 (writer)
  • Leah Williams: Domino Annual #1 (co-writer)
  • Margaret Stohl: The Life of Captain Marvel #3 (writer)
  • Mariko Tamaki: X-23 #4 (writer)
  • Natacha Bustos: Domino Annual #1 (interior art), Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur #35 (interior art, cover)
  • Rainbow Rowell: Runaways #13 (writer)
  • Sara Pichelli: Avengers #7 (interior art), Fantastic Four #2 (interior art)
  • Sing Ji: Spidergeddon #0 (variant cover)
  • Tini Howard: Captain America Annual #1 (writer)
  • Vanessa Del Rey: Sentry #4 (variant cover)
  • Yasmine Putri: X-23 #4 (variant cover)

All together, there are 26 different female creators scheduled to work on 21 different comic books at Marvel in September, 1 more creator than in August and the same number of books. As far as I can tell, there are no non-binary creators listed in Marvel’s solicits. So we don’t have much of a gain here, but what we do have is some much needed stability. The publisher has had at least 20 female creators in their ranks for four months running now, and this is their highest total since last September. Of course, Marvel’s been well into the 30s before so the mid-20s is nothing to write home about. Hooray for staying out of the teens and all, but there’s still a long way to go for the publisher to reach the level they’re capable of.

We’ve got some new creators set for September. Two of them, Eve Venture and Sing Ji, are on variant covers, while Tini Howard is writing a Captain America annual. These are all one-time gigs, but who knows where they could lead in the future? I don’t think we’ve seen Agnes Garbowska at Marvel before either, and she’s on covers for a new Marvel kids’ book.

New titles are few for September, but Asgardians of the Galaxy is set to debut and it features both Angela and Valkyrie. Everything else is dudes, including returns for Wolverine and Iceman. So there aren’t a lot of female characters premiering in new books this month, but there aren’t too many new books either.

Overall, September looks decent for female creator representation at Marvel. It’s taken a while for the publisher to dig out of their hole, but now their numbers are holding strong at a reasonable level. Marvel can now be slightly less embarrassed about their lack of female creators! They should still be embarrassed to some degree, though. They’ve still got hundreds of dudes versus 26 women. But things are starting to look up.

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Women & NB Creators at DC Comics Watch, September 2018 Solicits: 15 Creators on 14 Books

July 17, 2018

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So, this is pretty terrible. DC’s female and non-binary creator numbers have been in the ballpark of the low 20s for a while, stable if noticeably below their past highs. But now, September marks a nosedive for the publisher. All of DC’s recent cancellations of female creator-led books have caught up with them, and they are set to post their lowest total in over than three years. Not good, DC Comics. Not good at all. Let’s take a look at who is doing what at DC this September:

  • Adriana Melo: Plastic Man #4 (interior art)
  • Amanda Conner: Harley Quinn #50 (cover), Supergirl #22 (variant cover)
  • Amanda Deibert: Teen Titans Go! #30 (co-writer)
  • Bilquis Evely: The Dreaming #1 (interior art)
  • Emanuela Lupacchino: Plastic Man #4 (cover)
  • Gail Simone: Plastic Man #4 (writer)
  • Jenny Frison: Wonder Woman #54 (variant cover), Wonder Woman #55 (variant cover)
  • Joelle Jones: Catwoman #3 (writer, interior art, cover)
  • Julie Benson: Green Arrow #44 (co-writer)
  • Mairghread Scott: Batgirl #27 (writer)
  • Nalo Hopkinson: House of Whispers #1 (writer)
  • Rachel Dodson: Justice League Odyssey #3 (variant cover), Supergirl #22 (cover)
  • Shawna Benson: Green Arrow #44 (co-writer)
  • Yasmine Putri: Red Hood and the Outlaws #26 (variant cover)
  • Zu Orzu: Cover #1 (variant cover)

All together, there are 15 different female creators set to work on 14 different comic books at DC this September, 10 fewer creators than in August and 5 fewer books. As best I can tell, there are no non-binary creators listed in DC’s solicits this month. So, this is quite a drop. Losing two fifths of your female work force in one month is not a good look. A lot of it can be chalked up the end of the “Young Animal” line, which was good for at least five female creators each month. And August’s numbers were ballooned by a variety of oneshots and special issues. With all of that gone, we’re left with some paltry numbers.

But some new faces, at least. We’ve not seen Zu Orzu before, and she’ll be providing a variant cover for the first issue of the series Cover. We’ve got a returning favourite as well with Amanda Deibert, and the launch of two of the new “Sandman Universe” line brings us Bilquis Evely and Nalo Hopkinson on a regular basis. The gains haven’t counter balanced the losses, clearly, but at least there were some gains, a couple of which we’ll be seeing a lot of moving forward.

In terms of female characters, we’ve got a few things going on. Harley Quinn and Wonder Woman were name checked in the solicit for the first issue of Heroes in Crisis, so they should be playing a part in that. Both of the new “Sandman Universe” books have female leads too, as does Cover. August’s endings took away a lot of female characters as well, so having a few new leads in the mix is nice.

Overall, despite these new characters and my great excitement for the “Sandman Universe,” September looks to be a rough month for female and non-binary characters at DC. Here’s a startling fact: There are only FIVE superhero titles this month that aren’t written or drawn entirely by men. That is very few indeed. Also, there are just TWO women doing interior art across the entirety of DC’s line. That is an embarrassingly low number. All of the lovely covers listed above will be grand, I’m sure, but it’s nice to have women drawing the insides of the book too. And the sad fact is, we’re going to need to see some big changes to the line to pull DC up out of the teens. Some books have been announced, and things should improve somewhat over the next couple months if everything else can remain steady, but the publisher has a lot of ground to make up now after digging themselves into such a hole.

Wonder Woman #50 Review: IT’S! FINALLY! OVER!

July 11, 2018

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First of all, gang, congratulations. We made it. This has been an overly long, bizarrely terrible run of Wonder Woman comics, and now those dark days are at an end. We’ve got one extra-sized anniversary issue to chat about, and then we are free. Oh, there will be bad writers again. That’s inevitable. And ludicrous narratives that center a male character in a book called Wonder Woman, sure. Superhero comics are a weird game. But for now, let’s enjoy the fact that this particular awful era is over. The franchise is tarnished, but not destroyed. Wonder Woman’s endured some truly horrible arcs over the decades. If anyone can shake off a bad run, it’s her. So let’s dig into this final outing for James Robinson, but first:

SPOILER ALERT!!

I am about to reveal the ending to this foolish, boring arc!

Look away if you haven’t read it yet!

Though, good call if you haven’t!

You aren’t missing anything, really!

When last we left our intrepid heroine, her brother had been turned by the Dark Gods and she was facing an uphill battle against her silly, poorly designed foes. But this issue doesn’t pick up there. No, this issue needed an awkward framing device. Something to give us stilted exposition as Wonder Woman looked back on the fight. We learned two things straight away: First, Wonder Woman survived. Big sigh of relief there. And second, Jason’s fate was far less pleasant. But what happened?

Basically, Jason played the Dark Gods by pretending to be in their thrall and using his bevy of divine powers. For some reason, Robinson thought it would be fun to point out each power and which deity it came from every time Jason used one? There were a lot, all of them awkwardly interjected. It’s nice to see some consistency, I suppose. The guy started out his run making some very questionable dialogue choices, and he ended his run doing the same.

In the end, Wonder Woman doesn’t do much of anything but punch some gods while Jason sacrifices himself to save the world. He allows the gods to possess him, and all of his divine powers, on the promise that they will leave Earth and return to their own dimension. Thus is the planet spared from their evil influence, and everything returns to normal.

First off, ugh. This entire run has been terrible at showcasing Wonder Woman, in general but as a hero specifically. She’s been sidelined again and again, and her few victories have been underwhelming to say the least. So to give the win in the SPECIAL FIFTIETH ANNIVERSAY ISSUE OF HER OWN BOOK to her big, dumb brother is just adding insult to injury. Wholly expected, frankly. This era has been far more about him than it has her. But still, gross. Wonder Woman is the last book where we need a man to save the day, and a big celebratory issue is the last place to do it. Robinson tries to frame it as Jason recognizing that Diana would never give up the fight, blah blah blah, but the end result is a) Jason does all the talking, b) Jason controls the narrative, and c) Jason ends up as the hero of the book. Wonder Woman ends up as a side character in her own series once again, and spends a significant chunk of the book having to rhapsodize about her brother’s sacrifice.

Second off, though, hooray! Jason is gone! To a whole other dimension, even. If the folks at DC Comics are smart, we’ll never have to see him again, though after this run I have little to no confidence in the intelligence of anyone at the publisher who thought that this book was worth printing. Still, he’s out of the picture for now, and maybe out of the picture forever. Wonder Woman can be about Wonder Woman again and we can all pretend that this run never happened. Such is the beauty of superhero comics. The good, important arcs live forever as iconic elements of a character’s past, deservedly referenced and celebrated for ages. The bad, pointless arcs just sort of disappear and we never ever bring them up again.

It truly is a shame that the writing on the book has been so bad, because so many artists have been working very hard to make the best of it. Two of my recent favourites, Emanuela Lupacchino and Stephen Segovia, returned for this final issue, and their pages were quite lovely, as always. Lupacchino draws an absolutely gorgeous Wonder Woman, while Segovia’s ability to capture action never fails to disappoint. And of course, the excellent colouring of Romulo Fajardo Jr. held it all together, as it has for months now. I do hope that the work of all of these artists is remembered fondly, even as we all try to forget the writing. It hasn’t been fun to read the words in Wonder Woman for a long while, despite Saida Temofonte laying them out quite nicely for us, but it’s often been a nice book to look at, and I really appreciate that.

So now that it’s all over, let’s do a quick post-mortem. How did this even happen?! We got the tease of a brother in the “Darkseid War” event, presumably planted by Geoff Johns, who is kind of a big deal at DC. The general response was that this was a very bad idea, but I think we all assumed that it must be important since it was one of the big reveals at the end of a major event series. And then we get this. An utterly pointless, inconsequential arc that derailed what had been the strongest run on Wonder Woman in some time. At a time when Wonder Woman has never been more popular thanks to the movie, even! I don’t understand it. Not in the least. This was all so unnecessary. So counter to what fans were clamouring for. So poorly written and put together. So contrary to the renewed spirit of the character and her focus on female strength and power. Honestly, it felt like the folks in charge of Wonder Woman decided to take a nine month vacation and just put out whatever. This run was an embarrassment. DC squandered the perfect opportunity to make Wonder Woman a huge book by churning out this absolute dreck, and I’ll never understand what they were thinking.

But now it’s done with! And we’ve got what looks to be some fun issues on the horizon. Steve Orlando is stepping in to write the book for the next five issues, and he’s always a good time. We’ll see Laura Braga on art in two weeks time, which is an excellent choice. She’s wonderful, and familiar with the character from her fine work on DC Comics Bombshells. Then we’ve got ACO, a solid artist and a frequent collaborator of Orlando’s, and Raul Allen, someone who’s work I’m not familiar with but who a quick Google image search tells me looks to have a cool style. I’m looking forward to all of it. And then, here is some breaking news, G. Willow Wilson of Ms. Marvel fame is taking over the book, with art from Cary Nord! G. WILLOW. WILSON. She’s amazing. This is the best news. What a fantastic announcement to add to the joy of this run being over! Things are going to get good, gang. SO GOOD.

Go Support the “Sally the Sleuth” Reprint Collection on iFundWomen!

July 3, 2018

sallyBefore there was Wonder Woman or Lois Lane or Catwoman there was a Sally the Sleuth, a private eye with a knack for losing her clothes whose adventures appeared in the Spicy Detective pulp books. Written and drawn by Adolphe Barreaux, her original black and white adventures began in the early 1930s and ran for over a decade before she came back in a more sanitized, full colour format in the early 1950s. Bedside Press is crowdfunding a new printing of all of these tales, the most thorough collection of Sally the Sleuth stories ever assembled.

I got to write the introduction for this collection, and it was absolutely fascinating to dig into the history of the character. My introduction begins with the grandiose claim that there would be no Superman without Sally the Sleuth, but it’s true. Long before Harry Donenfeld launched DC Comics, he was a publisher of pulp magazines that featured lurid crime stories. Sex was a major focus, and the dirty stories were a popular product. In 1934, Adolphe Barreaux convinced Donenfeld to expand outside of prose and add some comics to his books, and the “Sally the Sleuth” strip in Spicy Detective was their first attempt. It proved popular and more followed. Eventually, Donenfeld got into the comics game full time in the late 1930s, first with Detective Comics and later with Action Comics. Once Superman and Batman took off with young readers, more series followed and the comic book business became Donenfeld’s priority. But it all started with Sally.

“Sally the Sleuth” was very much in the vein of the lascivious prose stories that surrounded it. Sally was a private detective, but most of her adventures went awry and resulted in her ending up half dressed (if that) and often captured. Still, the two-page feature was more than just dirty thrills. Sally was tough and fierce, and with the help of her associates she nabbed the bad guys more often than not. She was also especially dedicated to helping the women who were used and abused by the criminal underworld. It was a sensationalistic nudie strip, to be sure, but one with some surprisingly progressive aspects.

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After her black and white run ended, Sally came back in the early 1950s with a longer, full colour feature that appeared in Trojan Comics’ Crime Smashers comic book series. The nudity was gone, but the crime busting element remained, and the tales were sometimes gruesome. So gruesome, in fact, that the book was cited in Fredric Wertham’s infamous Seduction of the Innocent for having dangerous content that polluted young minds.

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Both eras are well represented in this new collection. Hope Nicholson of Bedside Press has been hard at work painstakingly tracking down old pulp magazines, and she’s compiled the vast majority of Sally’s early outings plus all of the later, full colour stories. It’s an impressive assortment of tales, and the most complete collection of Sally the Sleuth stories ever assembled. This book will print the early adventures in their original black and white and the later Crime Smashers tales in full colour. It all looks super sharp. Plus, as I’ve already mentioned, you get an introduction from me! It was a blast to write. She’s such an interesting character, and she played a surprisingly important role at several key stages in the history of the comic book industry.

Hope has partnered with iFundWomen, a crowdfunding platform for women-led startups and small businesses. It’s a lot like Kickstarter, but with a special focus on empowering women that is very cool to see. There are several different reward levels, including ebooks, a simpler black and white collection, and the big, full colour collection. The prices are very reasonable, too. Hope’s got a fondness for high quality, archival reprints and she wants folks who are interested in the same to have affordable access to some nice books. She’s also got a great track record with her collections, from Nelvana of the Northern Lights to Brok Windsor, so you know you’re getting on board with a proven publisher.

You should definitely check out the page, and get on board if you’re interested. Sally the Sleuth is a fascinating, forgotten figure whose place in comic book history deserves to be remembered and appreciated. I hope you’ll pick up the collection! It’s going to be gorgeous and will look great on your shelf!

Wonder Woman #49 Review: It’s Almost Over, Gang. Just One More Issue.

June 27, 2018

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This week’s issues of Wonder Woman takes “The Dark Gods” one step closer to its conclusion, and one step closer to the long-needed introduction of a new creative team. On the plus side, Wonder Woman is actually in this one, a nice change from the utter lack of her two weeks back. On the negative side, everything else is about the same, i.e. not at all good. This entire run has been weak, but “The Dark Gods” is especially bland. James Robinson used to be known for innovative superhero narratives. Starman is a classic, and even more recently his Scarlet Witch book was enjoyably outside the norm for Marvel. But his Wonder Woman run has just fallen flat, time and again. As we near the conclusion of his run, nothing feels fresh or interesting. It’s superhero paint-by-numbers, with every move telegraphed and every turn expected, especially this issue’s cliffhanger. It’s just boring. Even so, we’ll get into it all, but first:

SPOILER ALERT!!

I am about to reveal everything that happens in this issue!

Though if you’ve ever read a superhero story, you can pretty much predict how this one is going!

It’s mind-numbingly straight forward stuff!

So Wonder Woman is back from Zamaron, and that is good. Wonder Woman is always better when Wonder Woman herself is in it, even if that improvement only takes the overall quality from awful up to very bad. The Dark Gods are doing terrible things across the Earth, and she and Jason are focusing on their leader, the oddly named King Best, a giant stone monster with red eye beams. He’s a weird villain. The other four Dark Gods have powers that compel people to behave in certain ways en masse, whether it’s starting large scale wars, getting lost in a thrall, inspiring suicides, or a nationwide extreme orgy. It’s all very gruesome, but destructive in a way that’s mildly interesting at least. And then the Big Bad is just a rock man with laser eyes. It feels like a step down in creative villainy. He absorbed the Justice League in the last issue, I suppose. That’s something. But compared to the twisted powers of the other Dark Gods, King Best seems a little humdrum.

Anyway, Wonder Woman and Jason beat up the dude for most of the issue, pulling the old “knock him down but he’s not finished yet” cliché as the issue nears its end. Then Diana meets up with Steve while Jason flies off to fight with one of the lesser Dark Gods on his own, and you’ll never guess what happens next. Oh wait, you’ve guessed it already? It’s an obvious twist that we’ve all been expecting for weeks? That plays out pretty much exactly how we thought it would? Okay then. Yes, Jason has been turned to the dark side. Gasp. I’ll be on the edge of my seat for the next two weeks, waiting for the epic conclusion to this mind blowing cliffhanger.

I mean, this is just some ridiculously lazy writing. I do appreciate that Robinson actually tried for half a second with the lesser Dark Gods and made them somewhat intriguing. Those are frightening power sets that, in the hands of a writer that actually seemed at all invested in telling a cool story, could have been really interesting. But this Jason twist is just weak. Literally everybody on the planet has just been waiting for him to turn bad, even the billions of people not reading this comic book. If you explained the gist of this run to a random stranger on the street, their first reaction would be, “Oh, that brother is going to turn evil, FOR SURE.” And now he has, in another shrug of a final page reveal.

The artwork in the issue isn’t exactly elevating the uninspiring story, either. Jesus Merino’s work is fine, if somewhat standard superhero fare. It lacks the beauty of Emanuela Lupacchino’s linework, or the exciting action of what Stephen Segovia’s shown us lately. Merino is a solid, reliable artist, very much in the wheelhouse of DC’s generic house style. There’s nothing bad about it, but there’s nothing particularly fun or compelling either. It’s exactly the sort of thing you’d expect to see in a mid-tier superhero book nearing the end of an lackluster run. Actually, no. It’s slightly better than that. I’ve seen some bad arcs peter out with rough art, and Merino’s a step above that. He does the job, and tells the story. It’s not his fault that the story is terrible.

Romulo Fajardo Jr. is still in the mix though, laying down those good, good colours that make this book exciting every two weeks. The story and the linework rarely do much for me, but Fajardo’s always got something cool on the go. This week, it’s his subtle progression of time through the opening fight scene. It begins late in the day, with a sky that’s starting to darken. And it darkens more as the fight goes on, until Wonder Woman is flying in front of a full moon after the fight ends. The dude even takes the time to add a nice sunset effect when King Best gets thrown into the Atlantic Ocean. I love the effort we get from Fajardo with each issue. The man is top notch. As is letterer Saida Temofonte, who makes the bad words read well. The story might not be good, but dang if it isn’t laid out perfectly for easy reading.

And now the best thing of all: We’ve only got one issue left, gang. It’s going to be a big one, a special fiftieth issue shindig with some extra pages, but then we are free! Steve Orlando is coming in with Laura Braga on art, and the old era will pass away as a new one begins. I’m so ready. I’ve been ready since Robinson’s first issue, really, and now we are finally at the end. Gosh, it would be fun to write a positive review again. And I’ve got a good feeling about this creative team. ONE MORE ISSUE LEFT. Thank the gods, Old and New and Dark.

Joye Murchison Kelly and Dorothy Roubicek Woolfolk to be Honoured with Bill Finger Award

June 14, 2018

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This is very, very cool. Two of the most important women in the early history of Wonder Woman are going to receive the Bill Finger Award at San Diego Comic-Con this summer. Joye Murchison Kelly was a ghost writer for William Moulton Marston in the early 1940s, while Dorothy Roubicek Woolfolk was an assistant editor on the original Wonder Woman comics and later returned to DC for a fascinating run editing Superman’s Girl Friend Lois Lane. Heidi MacDonald has a full report at The Beat, and you can read more on the official Comic-Con page.

The Bill Finger Awards honour comic book creators who have not received proper credit for their work and contributions to the industry. Bill Finger was famously screwed over by Bob Kane and DC. He did most of the work creating Batman, but Kane took all the credit. The awards were created by Finger’s friend Jerry Robinson in 2005, and 28 creators have won it since. Kelly and Woolfolk are the first women to do so.

I’ve written about both of these women in my books Wonder Woman Unbound and Investigating Lois Lane, and I’m absolutely delighted that they’re sharing this award. Both women are compelling and important figures in the history of the genre, and their work has been overlooked for decades.

In Kelly’s case, it’s because she was never credited. Marston hired her as a writing assistant in 1944, and she was soon writing full issues by herself as Marston’s health began to fail. Everything was still credited to “Charles Moulton,” Marston’s penname, in the comics, and Kelly’s contributions were long forgotten until DC’s Wonder Woman Archives line gave her due credit many decades later.

Kelly wrote several classic Wonder Woman stories featuring some of her most well known villains, including Dr. Psycho, the Cheetah, Dr. Poison, and more. She also continued Marston’s themes of female strength and power extremely faithfully, including Marston’s preoccupation with bondage imagery (it was a metaphor, but it had its limits). Perhaps most notably, Kelly coined Wonder Woman’s famous catchphrase “Suffering Sappho!” It had ancient Greek roots, of course, but was also a subtle nod to what the Amazons were actually getting up to on Paradise Island.

Woolfolk was an assistant editor on Kelly’s comics back when she was just Dorothy Roubicek. She worked for All-American publisher Max Gaines and was the first female editor at DC Comics, making sure that all the books came out on time. And when critics objected to Marston’s bondage fixation, Woolfolk was tasked with coming up with ways to tone things down. Marston didn’t listen to any of them, but it speaks to Gaines’ high opinion of her that she was his go-to gal on matters concerning his bestselling comic.

(Some sources suggest that Woolfolk wrote a few early Wonder Woman stories, but that doesn’t seem to be the case. She’s not credited as a writer in any of the Archives collections, which are painstakingly thorough).

Woolfolk worked for other publishers for a while, then married writer Bill Woolfolk and took a break from publishing when she had her kids. She returned to DC in the early 1970s as a full editor and revitalized the publisher’s romance line with fresh, relevant stories. Because of her success there, she was given control over Superman’s Girl Friend Lois Lane, and she brought the same modern, feminist sensibility to everyone’s favourite reporter. In her first issue, Lois dumped Superman and quit her job at the Daily Planet because she was sick of men telling her what to do. This feminist revolution was short-lived, though. The men in DC’s offices didn’t take kindly to having a woman around, and Woolfolk was unceremoniously ousted a few months later. You can read more about that in an excerpt from Investigating Lois Lane over at The Atlantic.

Both women are absolutely fascinating figures in comic book history, and this award is very much deserved. Kelly is 90 years old now, and will be in San Diego to accept the award. Woolfolk passed away in 2000, but her daughter will be there to accept the award on her behalf. This recognition is long overdue, but I’m so happy it’s here. Wonder Woman wouldn’t be the same without Kelly or Woolfolk, and I hope the award encourages fans and comic book historians alike to dig into their great work.

Wonder Woman #48 Review: All Jason, All The Time. I Could Not Be Less Interested In This.

June 13, 2018

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Nope. Nope nope nope.

I’m not going to waste an hour of my life writing a review of a Wonder Woman comic that stars her stupid brother for the whole dang thing.

We’ll get into it all, briefly, but first:

SPOILER ALERT!!

Look away if you don’t want to know what happens in this Wonder Woman comic book that barely has Wonder Woman in it!

Ugh, this run.

THE WORST.

So basically, while Wonder Woman’s whisked off to Zamaron for the events of last week’s annual, Jason is left behind to fight the Dark Gods on his own. He uses a magic spear that I’m pretty sure is a rip off of the Chance Lance from Adventure Zone. And also he instantly knows everything about the Dark Gods because of the Athena powers in his special suit and he painstakingly tells us all about them via lengthy narration. Then the Justice League shows up to help for a bit. They lose. Wonder Woman is on the first and last page, and that’s it for her.

The Dark Gods look goofy. Jason is terrible. This issue is dumb and bad.

The end.

We’ll be back in two weeks, with Wonder Woman actually in the mix this time. Two more issues until this is over, gang. We’re almost there.


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